The Official Writing Challenge
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Date
02/07/10
Very interesting and colourfully descriptive material. I especially enjoyed the light humour in your modern parallels of biblical events. Yet I'm also curious about how you view the harmonic animal imagery of Isaiah 11:6-9 and the reasons for the anticipation within the rest of creation in Romans 8:19; but a 750-word limit does require some selectivity.
Some of it was a bit over my head- I'm glad I have my trusty dictionary. The last part hit home with me. I had no problem understanding how blessed we are to have the chance to live forever in Heaven with Jesus.
02/09/10
Talk about a creative take on a topic!! Wow! This was very well done, and I enjoyed it very much. One word misused, I think: in the sentence "tooth and claw are a fair cry from..." I think you meant to say "far" cry. Right? But that's just a simple editing thing. Otherwise - what a grrrreat entry!
02/09/10
Expertly written and very thought-provoking. As an animal lover who loves God and knows He knows when a sparrow falls, I think we'll have animals for all eternity. Perhaps in the new earth, perhaps Eden as God planned from the beginning. Wouldn't that be wonderful?
Of course, I know only man has a soul. Very well done. a devotional filled with truth and humor.

Mona
(Covers my ears) LA LA LA LA LA LA
I don't want to hear it!

Very creative story.
I am an animal lover and the opening word let me know I was in for a gritty ride.

I choose to believe that my beloved pets will be in their own animal heaven.
This is a delightful piece, but I tend to lean more towards Barbara Culler's comment on my take on it. However, your story seems to align with some of my other thoughts about our beloved animals, as Anna Sewell, has stated in her book "Black Beauty"
"There is no religion without love...but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to other animals as well as humans, it is all a sham."

And I think you've struck another chord of truth that until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened.
02/09/10
This is a wonderful meditation on animals in the Bible and in our lives... with an interesting (sure to be controversial!) take on their eternal destinies. I tend to think that perhaps if an animal has been particularly loved by its owner, God in His mercy may recreate a (glorified) version of that pet in the New Earth. But that's a personal--not a theological--opinion. Anyway, very good food for thought! I always enjoy reading your unique and insightful entries.
02/09/10
Shhh, I really shouldn't do this but ... here's a little clarification.
I'm not saying that there won't be animals in heaven, only that the ones we know here on earth won't make it (sob). I thought Loren's comment on love and respect was particularly insightful.
As regards Isa 11, this is paralleled and expanded in Isa 65 where it speaks of children being born and of old men dying after a long life, hence it can't possibly be speaking of Heaven. Some theologians would say that that particular era is the millennium. Bless you.
02/10/10
Thanks for the clarification. I couldn't imagine Heaven without animals, and since I don't claim to be a Bible Scholar, I am anticipating seeing my own pets bounding through green pastures. (It doesn't hurt to hope) Great take on the topic.
02/21/10
Loved this piece. In Romans 8:21-23 it talks about ALL CREATION groaning as we wait eagerly for the redemption of our bodies.

Randy Alcorn's book, "Heaven" has a lot of interesting things to say about this very subject. "And all flesh will see the salvation of God" Luke 3:6 NASB. The Greek word translated "flesh" is sarx. Some Bible versions translate this as "all people" or "all mankind," but the word is more inclusive. "All flesh" includes animals. They too will behold and benefit from Christ's redemptive work."

He further states, "If it would please us to have a pet restored to the New Earth, that may be sufficient reason...God is better than we are at giving good gifts to his children."

Personally, I think Alcorn makes some very good points.