Who or Whom?

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Anja
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Who or Whom?

Post by Anja » Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:44 pm

Do we all know the different between the "subject" and the "object"? It will help clarify when to use "who" and "whom".

The "subject" of a sentence is the one "doing the doing."

The "object" of a sentence is the one "receiving the doing" of the subject.

Who is always the subject.
Whom is always the object.


You might have to twist a sentence around to get who is doing the doing and who is receiving it.

Who is going to the auction? ("Who" is doing the "going," and that makes "who" the subject.)

To whom do I give my heifer? (I am giving my heifer to "whom"? "Whom" is receiving the "giving" and that makes "whom" the object.)

Grammar Girl has some awesome tricks for remembering.
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educat ... ersus-whom


And while we're here, let's talk about "who's" and "whose."

Who's = WHO IS............ Who is going to the auction?

Whose = OWNERSHIP...... Whose heifer is this?
Ann Grover Stocking

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

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Re: Who or Whom?

Post by oursilverstrands » Thu Nov 06, 2014 10:02 pm

Who is always the subject.
Whom is always the object.
Ann, thank you for this "no frills" distinction. Jan cleared up my confusion about "Who's and Whose." How blessed we are to have both of you. You add to the uniqueness of the Faithwriter site.

Lillian
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I write even when I think I can't, because I must. :-)

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"Let words bewitch you. Scrutinze them, mull them, savor them, and in combination, until you see their subtle differences and the ways they tint each other." Francis Flaherty

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Re: Who or Whom?

Post by oursilverstrands » Sun Nov 09, 2014 10:52 am

Oh dear! Ann, I thought I had the "Who" and "Whom" well sorted out, until I wrote the following sentence, and my uncertainty surfaced again.

This is what I think it should be based on your post:

"Carol, whoever she is, should be pretty proud of her daughter."

But if I turn it around, it reads as, "she is whoever. So shouldn't "whomever" replace "whoever" because it is the object of the verb "is?" Hate to think I'm thickheaded, but I've got to get this right. :roll:


Lillian
E-Book - Retirement Lane - How to Celebrate Life After 60
https://grammyspen.com
Fortunate 500


I write even when I think I can't, because I must. :-)

I love to write. Nothing escapes the crush I have on the written word. I'm hooked on words!!

"Let words bewitch you. Scrutinze them, mull them, savor them, and in combination, until you see their subtle differences and the ways they tint each other." Francis Flaherty

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Re: Who or Whom?

Post by Anja » Sun Nov 09, 2014 3:25 pm

Don't panic! There is a perfect solution.*


"Carol, whoever she is, should be pretty proud of her daughter."

First, we need to recognize that "whoever she is" is a noun clause.

It can be replaced by "she."
"She" is the subjective case.
Therefore, use WHOever.

Let's try another.

I will feed whoever/whomever shows up for lunch.

"Whoever/whomever shows up for lunch" is a noun clause.

It can be replaced by him / her.
'Him / her" is the objective case.
Therefore, use WHOMever.

So, the rule is ---

Consider the noun clause, independent of the rest of the sentence.

If the clause can be replaced by he / she, then it is subjective.
Use WHOEVER.

If the clause can be replaced by him / her, then it is objective.
Use WHOMEVER.


*The perfect solution, recommended by grammar gurus with much more expertise than I have, is to avoid sentences that require whoever/whomever.
Ann Grover Stocking

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

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