Question about POV

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DustBSH
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Question about POV

Post by DustBSH » Thu Jun 25, 2015 4:13 am

Hello Dear Ones.
I was studying a book that teaches on writing Romance and it talks again about the differences in POV. I have always learned it is very important to not switch POV and stay on track so as not to confuse the reader. However in this book it states you can write from several POV’s. I understand this and often do that. When I do so, I usually start a new chapter or use some ***. However this book seems to teach I can switch right in the middle. See the examle below. Since this book is written by an accomplished writer it confused me. What are your thoughts on this? To me it sounds confusing, and I would have rather stuck to Linda’s POV. However this writer claims it makes for an exciting read.

Short sample:
Linda’s blood was racing so fast she could feel it pulsing through her veins. If only Grant didn’t cause the heat mounting inside her womanly core, a fire only he could extinguish.
Tom spoke, “ You will both fly into Canada tonight.”
“Both?” She could kick herself for speaking out. That smirk Grant gave her said enough. He knew what she was thinking.
Tom spoke again. “Yes, both. Is that a problem for uou Miss?
“Of course not, Sir.”
“Good. And what about you Grant? Is that a problem for you?”
“Together has been my goal from the beginning, Sir.” He really shouldn’t have said it, but that blush that was now creeping up her elegant face was worth the grimace coming from Tom. No Grant would not argue with Tom’s orders. It may even help him to get a date.

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Re: Question about POV

Post by glorybee » Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:45 pm

DustBSH wrote:Hello Dear Ones.
I was studying a book that teaches on writing Romance and it talks again about the differences in POV. I have always learned it is very important to not switch POV and stay on track so as not to confuse the reader. However in this book it states you can write from several POV’s. I understand this and often do that. When I do so, I usually start a new chapter or use some ***. However this book seems to teach I can switch right in the middle. See the examle below. Since this book is written by an accomplished writer it confused me. What are your thoughts on this? To me it sounds confusing, and I would have rather stuck to Linda’s POV. However this writer claims it makes for an exciting read.

Short sample:
Linda’s blood was racing so fast she could feel it pulsing through her veins. If only Grant didn’t cause the heat mounting inside her womanly core, a fire only he could extinguish.
Tom spoke, “ You will both fly into Canada tonight.”
“Both?” She could kick herself for speaking out. That smirk Grant gave her said enough. He knew what she was thinking.
Tom spoke again. “Yes, both. Is that a problem for uou Miss?
“Of course not, Sir.”
“Good. And what about you Grant? Is that a problem for you?”
“Together has been my goal from the beginning, Sir.” He really shouldn’t have said it, but that blush that was now creeping up her elegant face was worth the grimace coming from Tom. No Grant would not argue with Tom’s orders. It may even help him to get a date.
First, my apologies for not getting to this for several days. I've been on vacation without my computer.

This appears to be written from an omniscient POV, which was once nearly always done and is a legitimate POV. However, it's not nearly so popular today, and most publishers prefer that if you switch POVs, you alert your reader that you're doing so--either with a new chapter for each POV character, or their own font, or setting the new POV apart with a row of asterisks--something like that.

I'm surprised that this excerpt is from an accomplished writer. It's certainly not the best writing I've ever read. However, romance is not my genre; this may be typical romance writing. Perhaps others will chime in on what's acceptable in romance writing these days.
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DustBSH
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Re: Question about POV

Post by DustBSH » Tue Jun 30, 2015 6:26 am

Thanks Jan
It's always refreshing hearing from you. I understand your response. I will stick safely to the way I was taught as it just sounds/feels better to not write from an omniscient POV. Someone asked me to write a Christian Romance story, which is why I bought the book on Romance writing (online) I was hoping to pick up some tricks and tips as Romance isn't really my forte. We'll see what happens. I am always very encouraged to see the high standard I am encountering on Faithwriters.
Blessings.

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Re: Question about POV

Post by Cinnamon Bear » Fri Jul 03, 2015 12:01 pm

DustBSH wrote:Since this book is written by an accomplished writer it confused me.
Koos, I have been following this thread with great interest, especially since I have always been one to advocate not switching POV within the same chapter or section. :) I read a few more articles on the subject. There seems to be a consensus that switching POV within the same section is not a decision to be taken lightly, and should only be done if it actually improves the story.

I agree with Jan that the excerpt you quoted doesn't seem like very good writing. Did you check the reviews for this author--both of the book she wrote on how to write romances and the romance novels that she wrote? Sometimes the people who write one, two, and three-star reviews are more discerning. They may point out writing issues that the readers giving four and five-star reviews failed to spot.

Cinnamon Bear (Virginia Bliss)

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Re: Question about POV

Post by DustBSH » Sun Jul 12, 2015 4:08 pm

Yes, you are right Virginia.
I just gotten the book because of somebody wanting me to do a romance story, but it has raised several other questions and some of the examples this person is using are rather strange.
Better stick to the known and proven ways.
Sorry I did not respond earlier. I had not visited the Forum for a few days.
Kind regards
Koos

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Re: Question about POV

Post by DustBSH » Sun Jul 12, 2015 4:15 pm

Hi Virginia
One more point.
I did what you suggested, but there were no reviews on the particular book, but then I read some reviews on some other books this person wrote (Mind you 15 Novels)
Listen to what one person wrote:
"This book has so much potential, but it was a lost cause due to numerous distracting problems. Let's begin with the head hopping. The author jumped between the hero and the heroine's thoughts non stop. I'm talking within the same paragraph! It drove me crazy. It was hard to keep up with who was thinking what."
Well, that says it all.
:D

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Re: Question about POV

Post by Cinnamon Bear » Sun Jul 12, 2015 4:53 pm

DustBSH wrote:"Let's begin with the head hopping. The author jumped between the hero and the heroine's thoughts non-stop. I'm talking within the same paragraph! It drove me crazy. It was hard to keep up with who was thinking what."
Ha, ha! :lol:

Koos, the general writing instruction that we obtain at Faithwriters is a good guide for most genres, including romance. Also, there are numerous for-free websites that discuss specifically how to plan and develop a romance novel.

People who write cheap, sensationalist romance novels may be able to get away with poor writing and still sell their books. But good romance novels--whether for Christian or for more general audiences--are well written.

Virginia Bliss (Cinnamon Bear)

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