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Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:49 pm
by glorybee
GShuler wrote:I am offering proof that this type of poetry is way above my head and skill level:
(I am using this first one because I am famous in my own family.)

Gerald D. Shuler
Uses a ruler
For writing in meter...
But clarihews are definately sweeter.




Job
Doesn't rhyme with rob, but robe.
Does it matter, anyway?
He's not alive today.

another:

Sir Lancelot
got caught
with Gweneviere.
Oh, Dear.

Or how about this for an improvement?

Sir Lancelot
surely thought he'd not get caught
but this news was a blast
that traveled fast.


Gerald, you get my gold star this week. Your clerihews went from delightful to MORE delightful. My favorite is the first Lancelot one. So clever!

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:10 pm
by swfdoc1
Jan Worgul Akerson—
Of her cat you should not make fun.
If you do and write a clerihew and have a typo, too,
For payback, she’ll point it out to you.

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:20 pm
by glorybee
swfdoc1 wrote:Jan Worgul Akerson—
Of her cat you should not make fun.
If you do and write a clerihew and have a typo, too,
For payback, she’ll point it out to you.


And don't you forget it.

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:59 pm
by pheeweed
I still hate it, but I have to try again.

Billy Buck
Is the Red Sox schmuck
He’ll never make the Hall of Fame
Because his error lost the game


Phee

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:13 pm
by glorybee
Phee--perfect!

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:15 pm
by CherieAnn
Here is my attempt... :)

C3PO
Has a golden toe
He translates on the spot
But annoys R2D2 a lot

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:21 pm
by glorybee
Really clever, Cherie!

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 10:08 pm
by kahoosbt
Here's my try.

The name isn't a "given" name, but is how the person is referred to quite a bit...

The Balloon Boy’s Dad
Must be quite mad.
He wanted fame
So he used his own young son--how lame.

Shelley

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 10:15 pm
by glorybee
Good one, Shelley!

I was going to write one about him, but there's not much to rhyme with "Heene" except a naughty-ish word. You got around that very well!

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 10:45 pm
by CatLin
glorybee wrote:Good one, Shelley!

I was going to write one about him, but there's not much to rhyme with "Heene" except a naughty-ish word. You got around that very well!


Besides, I wouldn't have known who "Heene" was. I instantly recognized "Balloon Boy's dad" tho. :)

I having SUCH FUN reading everyone's clerihews!

Posted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:12 am
by pheeweed
CatLin wrote:
I having SUCH FUN reading everyone's clerihews!


Me too. I didn't know what they were called, but I've always loved this genre, even though I hate writing them. My favorite is the Lancelot one.

Phee

Posted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 10:07 pm
by Symphonic
I agree--it's so much fun to read these! Here are a couple of late additions.

One for the author of Gulliver's Travels:

Jonathan Swift
Set his hapless hero adrift
To satirize bureaucrats all
With creatures great and small.

And one for my favorite poet. Please note the exquisitely elegant (ahem!) forced rhyme in the second line:

Robert Browning
Of his achievements, The Ring and the Book's the crowning.
It would be more to his credit
If anyone had read it.


Carol S.

Posted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 10:32 pm
by glorybee
Carol, those were indeed both exquisite and elegant, no throat clearing necessary!

I can't wait to see what you'll do on limerick week.

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 12:19 am
by beff
I may be drummed out of FW for this... or at the least asked to sit in the corner of your Master Classroom.

Lizzie Andrew Bordon
Evaded tax evasion.
Originally she planned to buffet her parents with the ax.
But due to financial difficulties, she switched to whacks when she heard the government was threatening citizens with a restaurant and buffet tax.

:sofa

I tried to make the last line stay on one line, but it didn't cooperate. :(

Posted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:12 am
by yvonblake
glorybee wrote:Carol, those were indeed both exquisite and elegant, no throat clearing necessary!

I can't wait to see what you'll do on limerick week.



Limericks next week? Yay!

(I used limericks to teach poetry to my 4th-5th graders.)

I found myself falling into a limerick rhythm when I was writing these. I had to force myself to add a few more syllables so it would be even.

Yvonne