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Previous Challenge Entry
Topic: Heroes (03/08/04)

TITLE: Porcelain Man
By KAREN FASIG
03/10/04

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PORCELAIN MAN
Fine porcelain brings pleasure to the eye. The urge to touch it and feel the sleek beauty of its lines is irresistible. A delicate grasp and extreme care are used as the piece is lifted from its pedestal and examined for its flawless elegance.

Examination of every facet of the object is undertaken and soon what appeared perfect is exposed as flawed. A hairline fissure is discovered in the base. The destructive, spidery web of cracks weave their way up and down causing weakness in the structure. What wasn’t seen immediately now jumps out at the eye.

Disappointment sets in at the realization that this thing of beauty is damaged and not worthy of being placed on the pedestal upon which it sat. The same thing happens to
human heroes. They are placed on a pedestal because the world sees them as beautiful to the eye, or for some “thing” they accomplished.

The world has many reasons to worship someone as a hero, but upon close examination their hairline fissures become giant gorges that are insurmountable and doom them to fall from the pedestal people have placed them on.

Names abound throughout history of fallen heroes. Moses, Aaron, David, and even Solomon fell from the pedestal they were placed upon. Time hasn’t lessened the occurrence of fallen heroes, O. J. Simpson, Kobe Bryant, Martha Stewart, and Bill Clinton are just a few who come immediately to mind. All of them were made of porcelain. No matter what man creates, the core of it will always be corrupt.

There is only one who can stand upon a pedestal and never be taken down and that is Jesus Christ, but the world will do anything in its power to make sure that He is the last person that would ever be held up as a hero.

When Christ’s sinless life is held up as an example, ridicule follows. The voices decry cracks in His character. Accusations fly about His marital status, His sexual orientation and what the world sees as discrepancies in His Holy Word.

What they fail to see is that His hero status cannot be broken. Christ is not made of porcelain. In all of history never has one stood as Christ stands. His name can’t be defamed nor His glory denied. Never in history has anyone changed the face of the world as Christ has changed it. Time is even measured by His birth.

Women should herald him, as their knight in shining armor for, without His stand that all are equal in the sight of God, women would still be considered possessions instead of viable human beings. The poor should run to Him for His compassion on their plight.

The rich should model His attitudes of love and fairness to others. Every human being on this earth should practice His directive of “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” Matt 19:19 KJV. The marvelous thing about Christ as hero is that He became infamous for how He treated others not for what glory He could heap upon himself.

At one point someone called Him “The Good Master” and His replay came, “Why callest thou me good? None is good save one, that is God.” Luke 18:18 KJV. If humans could exhibit His true humility and concern for others, than heroes would no longer fall from their pedestals.

Someday, when our sin nature is banished from our bodies, we will be capable of being a hero in the image of Christ, but when that day finally comes, heroes will no longer be needed because we will be in the presence of the only hero ever to be born.


Karen L. Fasig
copyright 3/10/2004


Member Comments
Member Date
Sarah Balk Bond03/15/04
This piece conveys so many good things. I really liked the part about finding the one flaw demoted what was so lovely from its pedestal. You did a good job, thanks for sharing.
Leticia Caroccio03/15/04
Amen! As a new Christian, I am still in awe of my Master, who truly is the only superhero in my life. Very well written. Thank you.
Lynne Cox03/15/04
Most of us are porcelain, that's why we need Christ to make us whole. Lovely article, easy to read.
Jacqueline Odom-Bullock03/15/04
Clever! The way you use the comparison of porcelain and man.
Kenny Paul Clarkson03/18/04
I've often made the mistake of admiring porcelain people. Thank you for this reminder that, beind the polish and glimmer, are real people who can easily be damaged and will often disappoint.

Absolutely phenomenal analogy!
Linda Germain 03/18/04
Beautiful!
Dave Wagner03/20/04
It starts off great - perfect analogy. Nice work.

Toward the end, there are a few structural concerns with the starting of paragraphs. There are a few sentences that are complete thoughts on their own, and yet they are grouped with other sentences that are not related. I would restructure this way:

---------------------------------
Women should herald him, as their knight in shining armor for, without His stand that all are equal in the sight of God, women would still be considered possessions instead of viable human beings.

The poor should run to Him for His compassion on their plight.

The rich should model His attitudes of love and fairness to others.

Every human being on this earth should practice His directive of “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” Matt 19:19 KJV.

The marvelous thing about Christ as hero is that He became infamous for how He treated others not for what glory He could heap upon himself.
----------------------------------
A couple comments:

>> No matter what man creates, the core of it will always be corrupt.<<

I’m not sure I agree with this. God made man in His image, and part of that image is a desire to create. This is kind of an odd blanket statement that seems to condemn anything and everything man has ever created as corrupt. Maybe I’m missing something here, but I don’t see anything particularly corrupt about the light bulb or the cotton gin.

>>…we will be in the presence of the only hero ever to be born.<<

Maybe this should be re-worded…you named several heroes earlier in the piece, and they’ve all been born. Perhaps you mean, the only person who can legitimately claim the title Hero of heroes or something. In making your statement the way you did, you seem to invalidate almost every other submission on this topic, from people that pay homage to their favorite brother, parent, neighbor, public servant, pastor, etc.

The porcelain analogy is excellent. Don’t get the wrong impression – I really did enjoy your piece…I just think with some tweaks this piece could be ready for prime-time. But remember, this is all just one obscure dude’s well-intentioned opinion.
Dori Knight03/21/04
wow! i love your analogy!

don't we all, at times, feel as fragile as a piece of fine porcelain?

don't we all have hairline cracks and imperfections.

and isn't even the most beautiful of fine porcelain made of clay?

an analogy, well written, that i will not soon forget.

thank you!