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Previous Challenge Entry
Topic: Betrayal (02/16/04)

TITLE: MY OWN FAMILIAR FRIEND
By Angela Williams
02/16/04

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As the Lenten season approaches, depending on international location, thoughts can turn to a number of things. Many places celebrate carnival (farewell to flesh), with the accompanying bacchanalian carousing before the ‘sacrifices’ of the holy season. Then there is the ubiquitous Easter Bunny with his chocolate eggs, the Passion of Christ, Easter lilies and the promise of new birth.

Any contemplation of the crucifixion tends to encompass the idea of betrayal. Parents do not, as a rule, call their male offspring Judas, since the name has become synonymous with treachery. Yet one wonders how someone could have walked with Jesus, been his financial controller, shared his meals and then sold him out to the religious zealots of the day. He was his ‘own familiar friend.’ One school of thought is that Judas felt that Jesus would have escaped, as had happened before, while he would have been 30 pieces of silver richer, being the sharp businessman he was.

A question that comes to mind is “why didn’t Judas ask for forgiveness?” He was obviously sorry for what he had done according to Matthew 27:3-4, he returned the money and yet he felt he couldn’t live with himself so he took his own life. What a waste! His story could have been so much different. Look at Peter. His denial was a betrayal too. I believe the difference is that Peter knew his Lord. He understood the wonderful forgiving Saviour who had stuck with him even when he was at his most impetuous.

When the risen Jesus showed himself to his disciples (St John 21), as soon as Peter heard that it was the Lord, he jumped into the sea to go to him. It is instructive to note that Jesus addressed Peter three times during that session; “Lovest thou me?” The positive response each time seemed to cancel the three denials. There were no recriminations, only the instructions, “feed my lambs, feed my sheep, follow me.” What a beautiful example for us. Betrayal seems to be an integral part of the human condition but love and forgiveness cover “a multitude of sins.”


Member Comments
Member Date
Donna Anderson02/23/04
I cleave to his love the way his love held him to the cross. Wonderful article. :)
Dave Wagner02/23/04
Ooh, this one is gonna be hard to beat. Well written, no wasted words, and it includes a word I've never seen before in my life: that bacchiwhatever word. Very nice!

I've got some thought on Judas that apply, but I don't want to clutter this up with those comments. Maybe another time, in the forum or some such.

Thanks for posting. I just may be back to give this one my vote...
Bonnie Baker02/25/04
Angela - I have asked myself the same question about Judas - good article.
L.M. Lee02/26/04
Judas is so like me...it scares me. He saw everything Jesus did. He heard all the same sermons...but he completely missed it. I think about the times I try to "be my own god" and make forgiveness my way... instead of God's way.