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Previous Challenge Entry
Topic: Breaking the Rules (08/16/04)

TITLE: It’s On Fire!
By Annette Agnello
08/19/04

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All children are given certain rules: Look both ways before you cross the road, don’t talk to strangers, and the ever popular, don’t play with matches. There’s wisdom to those rules even though you don’t realize it when we’re young.

I was somewhere between ten and thirteen years old and I loved candle light. It was beautiful, it had a warmth, it had movement, and it made me feel grown-up. I could light a candle without doing anything really wrong, my parents said don’t play with matches but lighting a candle wasn’t playing. That was a rule for a baby and I wasn’t a baby anymore.

There was a TV in my parents room and I saw no problem about burning candles when I was watching TV. I had a candle and I was sitting on the floor by the bed so I could easily hide my disobedience, my sin, I thought...

I guess I was being too quiet and mom started coming upstairs to check on me. I didn’t want to have to light another match but I still wanted the candle lit so I stuck it under the bed.

Mom hadn’t even got to the door when I was screaming, “It’s on FIRE!”

No matter how old a mother is hearing those words can let Mother’s put on a real burst of speed.
“What?” she said rounding the corner. It started out, “What’s on fire,” and became, “What’s going on?” Mother’s have a way to get a lot of mileage out of one word.

She got water from the bathroom and started trying to put out the burning blanket and mattress and box springs. Acrylic melts, the corner of the blanket was ruined; the mattress was hard to put out you had to keep throwing water up inside. A king sized bed was too heavy to turn over and the burn was on the bottom because I had shoved a lit candle underneath the bed. The corner of the new bed, hardly a month old was a mess the blanket was melted on the corner, mom was hotter than the fire with anger. I had disobeyed her. I had done something very dangerous. I had disappointed her.

God didn’t make a mistake by putting, “Honor your father and mother...” in the Bible. Just as my parents didn’t make a mistake about fire. Even when you start to grow up there are some things you have to treat with respect. Fire, traffic, parents, God all deserve respect and, you can’t ignore what the rules they are there for a reason.


Member Comments
Member Date
Lynda Lee Schab 08/23/04
What a lesson! It's true we often learn the hard way and by that time we have disappointed God! But thankfully, He's merciful and forgives us every time! Just as I'm sure your mom did, right? :-)
Well done!
Blessings, Lynda
darlene hight08/23/04
Nice entry! It reminded me of a couple of articles that I could have written but I was lucky to get one in at all!LOL
L.M. Lee08/25/04
Gosh, I'm glad my kids never tried this one! :-)
Lucian Thompson08/25/04
Ooooh…when I think how bad that could have turned out…No doubt, you learned THAT lesson well!
Roberta Kittrell08/26/04
Wow! So dynamic and captivating! Would only make some punctuation and minor changes which might help the flow. Very well done. See below.


All children are given certain rules: “Look both ways before you cross the road.”, “Don’t talk to strangers.”, and the ever popular “Don’t play with matches. There’s wisdom to those rules even though you don’t realize it when you’re young.

I was somewhere between ten and thirteen years old, and I loved candle light. It was beautiful, it had a warmth, it had movement, and it made me feel grown-up. I could light a candle without doing anything really wrong. My parents said, “Don’t play with matches.”, but lighting a candle wasn’t playing. That was a rule for a baby, and I wasn’t a baby anymore.

There was a TV in my parents room and I saw no problem about burning candles when I was watching TV. I had a candle and I was sitting on the floor by the bed so I could easily hide my disobedience, my sin, I thought...

I guess I was being too quiet and mom started coming upstairs to check on me. I didn’t want to have to light another match, but I still wanted the candle lit, So I stuck it under the bed.

Mom hadn’t even got to the door when I was screaming, “It’s on FIRE!”

No matter how old a mother is, hearing those words can let mothers put on a real burst of speed.

“What?” she said rounding the corner. It started out, “What’s on fire,” and became, “What’s going on?” Mothers have a way to get a lot of mileage out of one word.

She got water from the bathroom and started trying to put out the burning blanket and mattress and box springs. Acrylic melts, the corner of the blanket was ruined; the mattress was hard to put out. You had to keep throwing water up inside. A king-sized bed was too heavy to turn over and the burn was on the bottom because I had shoved a lit candle underneath it. The corner of the new bed, hardly a month old, was a mess. The blanket was melted on the corner. Mom was hotter than the fire with anger. I had disobeyed her. I had done something very dangerous. I had disappointed her.

God didn’t make a mistake by putting, “Honor your father and mother...” in the Bible. Just as my parents didn’t make a mistake about fire. Even when you start to grow up, there are some things you have to treat with respect: fire, traffic, parents, God.... All deserve respect, and you can’t ignore the rules. They are there for a reason.
Roberta Kittrell08/26/04
Sorry, I omitted the closing quotation mark after the word "matches" in the first paragraph. I edit better with either a blue pencil or a red pen.
Mary Elder-Criss08/27/04
My son was always fascinated by fire. Surprised this never happened to us. Good entry on breaking the rules. Mary