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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 3 – Advanced)
Topic: Bridge (07/31/08)

TITLE: Interlude
By Sheri Gordon
08/06/08


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I sat at my mother’s baby grand piano—correction, my baby grand piano—letting my out-of-practice fingers massage the beautiful Ivers & Pond instrument. The smooth texture of the 100-year old ivory keys soothed my shattered spirit like cool balm on sunburned skin. Admittedly, I had looked forward to the time when this magnificent antique would adorn my living room—but that day came twenty years too soon.

Rummaging ravenously through boxes of Mom’s music, I was uncertain as to what I was searching for. But when I came upon it, I knew…this is what I had to play. Surprisingly, or maybe not surprisingly considering my current disillusionment with God, I bypassed literally hundreds of hymn books and “church” music. (And trust me, when you’re mom has been the church organist for fifty years, she owns pretty much every hymn book and “church” piece ever written.) Instead, the musical arrangements I selected to help bring comfort to my soul were songs I played during my adolescent years. Somehow, that put me back in my parents’ house, at this very piano…when the world was right.

I began my private concert with Fur Elise, Bach and Beethoven. After tiring of the classics, I transcended to Exodus and Brian’s Song; releasing frustrations while pounding on the keys during the fortissimo (very loud) phrases. I attempted to sing through free-flowing tears as I gently caressed the piano with My Way, Love Story, and Lost in Your Eyes…”I don’t mind not knowing what I’m headed for. You can take me to the skies.”

Abruptly, I halted my playing and reread the words I had just sung. ”I don’t mind not knowing what I’m headed for. You can take me to the skies.” I studied the words before and after this part of the song, referred to as the bridge of the piece. In musical composition, the bridge is an interlude, or contrasting section, that connects two parts of a composition. I noticed that in this particular song, the lyrics in the bridge brought the singer from questioning what was happening, to fully embracing and trusting the unknown.

That’s what I need God. I need a bridge in my life. I need to be able to let go of the past and trust You to take me to the unknown.

I don’t like where my life is now—I want to go back to how life was before the accident. But that is not possible. I know the bridge of my life will be different from the first part, and different from the next part, and quite possibly will be sung in a different key—something I’m not used to and won’t necessarily find pleasing or soothing to the ear—but I trust that it will provide the harmonic connection between these two distinct parts of my life.

The first phase of the song is over—it’s already been sung. With God as my Conductor, I need to continue playing the piece through the bridge…”I don’t mind not knowing what I’m headed for. You can take me to the skies.” I may only be able to sing those words mezzo-piano (moderately-quiet), but I must sing them.




********************************************************************************
“Lost In Your Eyes”
words and music by Deborah Gibson. Recorded on Atlantic Records in 1988.


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This article has been read 969 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Jan Ackerson 08/07/08
Oh, I love this on so many levels! As a pianist, I recognized the pieces you listed, and the terminology really spoke to me.

It's funny--while I was on vacation, we speculated on the many different approaches people could take for "bridge", but I don't think we came up with a musical bridge.

Finally, of course, the message of your piece is powerful and beautiful...thanks for being transparent with us...it's beautiful.
Leigh MacKelvey08/07/08
Ahh, an interlude. What a creative take on this topic.
And beautiful writing too. The metaphors painted visual images and the writing has an honest feel too it ... a quite truth.
I'm sure this piece will give every reader wisdom for a
time(s) in their lives when they needed God to provide an interlude.
Loren T. Lowery08/08/08
I never thought of this until you wrote this wonderful piece; but sometimes when I sit down to play the piano, indeed my thoughts are bridged over to meet God. Great, creative and insightful approach to the challenge. Thank-you!
Joanne Sher 08/09/08
Very creative take on the topic. Your explanation was just enough to help me understand, but not so much that it overwhelmed. Very real emotion.
Leigh MacKelvey08/14/08
congratulations! I knew this was a food writing!
Verna Cole Mitchell 08/14/08
Beautifully written. Congratulations on placing.
Amy Michelle Wiley 08/14/08
I love how God uses different things in our everyday lives to reach us with His message.
Betsy Markman08/14/08
Beautifully written!
Patricia Turner08/14/08
Wonderful how the bridge of an interlude took your MC to the bridge to a new life! So well written. Congratulations!
Karlene Jacobsen 08/27/08
This is absolutely beautiful. How healing it is when God reaches into those areas of our life that hurt and He brings comfort; when we least expect it.

Your piece has the potential to be a beacon in someone elses darkest day.

Well, I think so anyway.