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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 3 – Advanced)
Topic: Easter (05/30/05)

TITLE: In Search of Empty Eggs
By Joanne Malley
06/04/05


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In Search of Empty Eggs


“Hey, that one’s mine…I saw it first!”

“Yeah, well I got it first,” said my eight-year old brother Ryan after he stuck his sloppy tongue at me. He’s two years younger than me and quite immature.”

A gob of chocolate oozed from the side of his mouth. He christened the sleeve of his freshly pressed shirt with Hershey’s milk chocolate.

Brothers are so gross!

We continued our hunt in search of as many eggs as possible. Ryan and I battled to find the most, especially the large ones with “special” goodies inside.

Every year Mom filled some of the eggs with five-dollar bills, movie tickets or small toys such as super balls. Our little sister, Katie, seemed happy enough with the four eggs she found. Her little fingers worked hard to open all her treats, as she remained unaware of the two ground-in grass stains on her white stockings.

I knew Mom would have a hissy fit the minute she saw Katie and Ryan. Oh, well,I thought. At least I stayed clean.

Dad popped his head out the back door.

“C’mon kids, finish your hunt. We’ve got to leave for Aunt Connie’s in twenty minutes.”

“Oh, but Dad—we’re still trying to find more of the large eggs that Mom fills with special treats,” replied Ryan.

“Ok—but I’ll be back out to get you kids soon.”

Ryan and I continued to scour behind every bush and possible hiding place. We both found several large eggs for ourselves. Our faces erupted with smiles over the value of what was inside.

Thank goodness our search ended before our time was up. We set our baskets on the lawn to uncover the newfound wealth inside the plastic eggs. Also, both of our mouths began to water at the thought of all the chocolate we’d eat all week.

However, as we opened our eggs, a number of them were empty.

“I got ripped!” yelled, Ryan. “Some of these are empty!”

“Me too,” I said. What’s up with that?”

I saw Dad stand on the deck.

“C’mon, kids, you’ve had enough time now, we’ve got to get going.”

I scooped up Katie. She finger-painted a chocolate collage all over her new dress. Mom would definitely not be happy.

“Dad, some of these Easter eggs are empty—how come?” asked Ryan.

“I’m glad you brought that up. It was actually my idea,” said Dad.

“Don’t take this the wrong way, Dad, but maybe next year you can come up with a better one!” I said.

“Well, now…it really is a very good idea if you let me share why.”

“What you don’t see in those eggs actually holds the most value. We’re often in search of what’s tangible and what appears to be worth having, as you’ve both done today. Our search for material wealth clouds our vision to what’s most valuable in our lives. We often find an irreplaceable treasure in what’s not seen, like in the empty eggs. Most often, we are blind to intangible treasures when our spiritual eyes miss what our physical eyes don’t see.

Ryan looked quizzically at Dad.

“What? I don’t get it,” said Ryan.

“Those empty eggs were meant to represent God’s unconditional love for you. Today is a reminder of how He showed that love long ago. It is the best gift any of us could ever receive,” explained Dad. ”For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him will not perish but have eternal life.” John 3:16, NLT.

“Oh, I get it,” I said. “Sort of like having yours and Mom’s love is better than any toy or gift you can ever give us?”

“Exactly, Maggie.”

“Consider this a new tradition every year as a reminder of God’s love,” said Dad.

I guess Dad thinks he’s a pretty smart guy. Maybe he wants us to search for as many “empty eggs” in life as we can.

I was quiet the whole way to Aunt Connie’s. I “got it” but I don’t think Ryan did. I caught Dad looking in the rear-view mirror with a big smile on his face.

He winked at me and spoke.

“You know, Maggie, there was more than God’s love in those empty eggs. There was something else I wanted you to find—a pair of eyes with a new vision and clarity.”

“Huh?”

“Never mind,” he said. “You’ve had enough of a lesson for one day.”


* * * * * * * *

I’m getting too old now for Easter egg hunts, I thought.

Next year, I’m just asking Mom for the five bucks and the movie tickets!


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This article has been read 889 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Kyle Chezum06/06/05
This was awesome! Very well-written. Keep up the good work!
WENDY DECKER06/06/05
Loved the dialogue. I almost thought my alter ego wrote a story without my knowing. I have a few, one being a ten year old boy.

Anyway, cute idea with the eggs. I hope you use or used it on your kids.(:
Debbie OConnor06/06/05
I like this. The depictions of the kids are very real. Great job.
Suzanne R06/07/05
Cute. But the child in me still says, "Hey, not fair!" Perhaps that's why people like me need pieces like this!
Sandra Petersen 06/08/05
Good lesson! The children in the story were pictured so realistically that I could imagine they were my own. A great job!
dub W06/08/05
Great dialog and cute story with a lesson for children.
darlene hight06/09/05
Very enjoyable read! Alot of fun!
Shari Armstrong 06/09/05
A nice lesson in an entertaining story. It would be good for a Sunday school take home paper.
Val Clark06/10/05
Left me with a smile on my face. She's got the point but still wants the goodies. So like kids, little and big. Great characterisation and interaction between the characters.
Maxx .06/10/05
I tried to finish this one but it was just too long! ROFL! Kidding... This is a very nice piece, JJ. I liked the beginning and the end. I stumbled a bit in the middle section, maybe because I'm reading like crazy trying to catch up. But the message is sound and the writing, as always, very polished.
Delores Baber06/10/05
My first thought re. the empty eggs was that an empty tomb was greater than all the other tombs in the garden. Each day is like an empty egg and God lets us decide what to fill it with. But as a child, I would have been hunting for the $5.00 egg. The lesson would have gone right over my head. No that is not a "short" joke. But the concepts in the story caused me to expand my thoughts to the symbolism of the empty egg. Thank you for sharing insights that led us to deeper levels of wisdoms.
Lynda Lee Schab 06/11/05
“What you don’t see in those eggs actually holds the most value. We’re often in search of what’s tangible and what appears to be worth having, as you’ve both done today. Our search for material wealth clouds our vision to what’s most valuable in our lives. We often find an irreplaceable treasure in what’s not seen, like in the empty eggs. Most often, we are blind to intangible treasures when our spiritual eyes miss what our physical eyes don’t see.

Ryan looked quizzically at Dad.

“What? I don’t get it,” said Ryan.

LOL - I was thinking the same thing! I thought, 'man those are some big words he's using for kids.'
Excellent writing with an absolutely awesome message. Great dialogue. Loved it (even the words I didn't understand - LOL)
Love, Lynda
Pat Guy 06/11/05
"...a pair of eyes with a new vision and clarity." - Wow - now that's something to think about - very good.
Linda Germain 06/12/05
Good lesson about spiritual eyes and physical eyes! Wonderful writing. One of my favorites.
Kevin Kindrick07/21/05
What a story, kept me hooked right to the end. I love the child's point of view, and an idea on how to teach spiritual value to children, thank you.
Oh, and I loved the end, "Next year I'll just ask mom for the five dollars and movie tickets." Straight from the mind of a child. Where do you get your insight?

God bless,

Kevin