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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 3 – Advanced)
Topic: Write something suitable for CHILDREN (05/31/07)

TITLE: Hannah Loste
By Ruth Neilson
06/03/07


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~For ages 8-12~

Hannah Loste used to love to stare out her apartment’s windows. They faced towards the two tall towers—where her dad once worked. She would wave good-bye to him as she got ready for school and he left to work. And she would wave hello to him when she got home from school. When she was younger, Hannah could see the towers from her classroom windows.

Now, she hated the windows. Hannah couldn’t look towards the now empty sky-line without remembering that day.

That bright Tuesday morning, not a cloud in the sky, her dad left for work like normal. Nothing was wrong, until two planes flew into the towers.

Fire.
Smoke.
Shards of glass.

Fire fighters and police ran into the building as Mom chased her away from the windows.

Mom pulled the curtains closed and changed the channel.

Again...
...and again...
...and again!

Soon Hannah and her mom couldn’t tell what was coming from the television and what was coming from outside.

Sirens were screaming.

Smoke twisting.
Smoke twirling.
Away from where the towers were.

“Mom, where’s daddy?”
“He’ll be home soon…”

Hannah bit her lip. Mom was scared, but so was she. Mom had chained the door shut, quickly.

They stayed there, peeking past the curtains and watching T.V.

Watching.
Waiting.
Praying.

Minutes turned into hours. Ash-covered men stumbled by, begging to use their phone, that didn’t work. Daddy still didn’t come home.

Hours turned into days.

Daddy still didn’t come home. Hannah and her mom made flyers and hung them around the city.

Have you seen...

His face joined thousands of others.

Hannah returned to school. To the windows that looked out at the empty skyline. During recess, Hannah would stand at the edge of the basketball court, looking for her daddy

A year passes.
Bells clang.
The world stands in silence as her daddy’s name is read.


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This article has been read 567 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Verna Cole Mitchell 06/08/07
You painted a vivid picture for a child for that terrible day.
Rita Garcia06/10/07
You brought such vivid reality to this story! Well written!
Jan Ackerson 06/11/07
Oh, how sad! A good example of how not all kiddie lit has to be puppies and rainbows. This is very well done, and would be great for a child therapist who deals with grieving children.
Beth LaBuff 06/11/07
This has become the history of a lot of American Girls. Hannah had to go on but would never forget that day. I like that you chose to do a different kind of children's story.
Dee Yoder 06/12/07
Think of all the children whose point of view of Sept. 11th can mirror your main character's. There are many children, sadly, who will be able to relate to this story.
Kristen Hester06/12/07
How sad. I have chills. I would think a child who went through such a loss would appreciate this story. Or maybe it would help those who still have their father realize how blessed they are and be more senstitive to others.
Dara Sorensen06/13/07
Good story to show loss.

I don't think you needed at the top "ages 8-12"--however it didnt detract from the actual story.

I think this would be a good book for children and adults alike to relate to.
Joanne Sher 06/13/07
Excellently done. Great for the age group you mention. This is very authentic, and I believe kids would definitely relate to this.
Jacquelyn Horne06/13/07
Very sad, but probably a very true account in some homes.
Sara Harricharan 06/14/07
This brought goosebumps. A sad and well-written piece. Good job. The name was also very fitting.