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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 3 – Advanced)
Topic: Write in the HISTORICAL genre (05/03/07)

TITLE: Hell's Bells
By Helen Paynter
05/07/07


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Hells Bells

Thomas Saunders was running. Wig askew, sweat glistening on his fleshy face, he dashed up the steps of the church. Boots thundering on the stone floor, he sprinted past the pew that his well-covered bottom had polished over the last quarter of a century.

As he rounded the corner into the bell-tower he tore off his coat with scant regard for the labours of his tailor. Leaping like a man of half his girth and a quarter of his bank-balance he seized the bell-rope and swung.

The news had arrived just a quarter of an hour ago. The messenger, hot from the furious ride from London, had ridden straight to the house of Mr Saunders, merchant and church-warden. Hearing the clatter of hooves outside, the gentleman of the house had left his boiled egg unfinished and opened the front door himself.

‘Wilberforce… The slavery bill…’ The rider spoke in short gasps.

‘Yes, yes. What happened, man?’ Saunders resisted the temptation to shake the other by his lapels.

‘You won… Large majority.’

Satisfaction spread over the church-warden’s face. ‘Martha!’ He bellowed to the housemaid. ‘Fetch a drink for my guest, and tell Robert to see to his horse.’

The girl arrived in time to behold the master, hatless, running out of the door like an errand-boy.



As he swung on the bell-rope, Thomas Saunders gave grateful thanks to God. The aberration was over. The world was once more as God had ordained it to be. And he must spread the news; must let the whole city know that all was well.

Each peal of the bell told the joyful news:

Clang - Our trade is safe.

Clang - The plantations can continue.

Clang - The abolitionists are defeated.



****
Based on the true events at St Mary Redcliffe church in Bristol, 1791, after the defeat of William Wilberforce’s first bill for the abolition of slavery.


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This article has been read 1014 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Jan Ackerson 05/10/07
Masterful--the irony of the title gave me shivers when I got to the end. A perfect example of an anti-hero POV. And I love your little details--the egg, the church pew, the wig--that give your piece atmosphere and realism.
Lynda Schultz 05/10/07
It amazes me that so-called godly men could enslave others and rejoice to continue such a beastly tradition. But hey, we have our own issues of that nature today, don't we. Well done, excellent description.
Linda Germain 05/10/07
Excellent title! You have managed to write volumes
'between the lines' (which is where really good writing often resides).Well done.
Cassie Memmer05/11/07
Excellent story telling in so few words! Great POV.
Joanne Sher 05/11/07
Perfect title - and amazingly well-told story. Gave me shivers.
Betty Castleberry05/14/07
The details in this piece are wonderful. I especially like the description of the man in the second line. You've said a lot in a short piece. Very well done.
Leigh MacKelvey05/14/07
How you can think of such wondeful description to write amazes me. I loved the image of his bottom polishing the pew! ( and his fleshy face) Title was tops!
Jacquelyn Horne05/14/07
Good accouting of this histrical tale.
Dara Sorensen05/16/07
I like it a lot! I love the little twist at the end.

I loved the first paragraph--great imagery--I especially liked this:

"Wig askew, sweat glistening on his fleshy face, he dashed up the steps of the church."

I can picture that so easily! This also reminds me of the movie that recently came out about Wilberforce called Amazing Grace.

Again, great job!