Hire
Writers
Editors
Home Tour About Read What's New Help Join Faith
Writers
Forum
My Account Login
Shop
Save
Support
Book
Store
Learn
About
Jesus
  

Get Our Daily Devotional             Win A Publishing Package             Detailed Navigation

The HOME for Christian writers! The Home for Christian Writers!
The Official Writing Challenge

BACK TO
CHALLENGE
MAIN

INSTRUCTIONS

how it works
submission rules
guidelines for
choosing a level

ENTRIES

submit your entry
read current entries
read past entries
challenge winners



Our Daily Devotional HERE
Place it on your site or
receive it daily by email.





TRUST JESUS TODAY

TRY THE TEST



Share
how it works   Submit

Previous Challenge Entry (Level 2 – Intermediate)
Topic: Flowers (10/03/05)

TITLE: 'THE LITTLE FLOWER'
By Gabrielle Morgan
10/04/05


 LEAVE COMMENT ON ARTICLE
 SEND A PRIVATE COMMENT
 ADD TO MY FAVORITES

“THE LITTLE FLOWER”

“To strew flowers – it is to offer Thee my griefs,
my joys, my little sacrifices, these are my flowers.
The rose, its petals strewn – true image of the heart
that would each moment immolate itself for Thee.”

These are the words of “St. Therese of the Child Jesus,” and they truly reflect the austere way of life she chose to live. In 1888, when Therese Martin was fifteen years old, she entered the Carmelite Monastery in her small home town of Lisieux, in France. After suffering an agonizing illness with tuberculosis she died in 1897 aged twenty-four. During the nine years she spent in the Carmel Therese practiced her “little way” to sanctity. She was declared a Saint and was canonized in l925.

Therese never missed an opportunity in her daily life to practice humility and sacrifice in order to enter into the heart of Jesus. Her very existence was an offering to Him. Every day was an opportunity to perfect herself in prayer and deed. The Prioress, Mother Marie de Gonzague, wrote the day after Therese’s Profession:

“This angelic child is only seventeen and a half;
yet she has the judgment of a woman of thirty,
the religious perfection of an old and accomplished
novice, and very good self mastery; she is a perfect
religious.”

Therese loved flowers, especially red roses and pink daisies. She likened herself to a “Little Flower” gathered by Jesus. She gave herself so entirely to Him.

Therese wrote in a letter to her sister Celine:

“I am not always faithful, but I am never discouraged; I leave myself wholly in the arms of my divine Lord;
He teaches me to draw profit from all –both good and ill that He finds in me(St. John of the Cross). He teaches
me to speculate in the Bank of Love, or rather it is He who acts for me without telling me how He goes to work,
that is His affair and not mine; my part is complete surrender, reserving nothing to myself, not even the
gratification of knowing how my credit stands with the Bank.”

Therese was a writer and poet. Her autobiography, “Story of a Soul” has now been read by millions of people worldwide. It has been claimed as a spiritual masterpiece. St. Therese, “The Little Flower” has indeed bloomed in Heaven.

When she was dying one of the Sisters expressed what sorrow she would feel on her death and Therese replied encouragingly,
“Oh no, you will see; it will be like
a shower of roses.”

True to her word, roses keep appearing in peoples lives in fulfilment of prayer. Long after her death, her work continues for the conversion of souls into the heart of Jesus. The example of her “little way” has touched so many.

Quotations from “St. Therese of Lisieux – her last conversations.”
Translated by John Clarke, O.C.D.
“Thoughts” Translated from the French “Pensees”
by an Irish Carmelite.


The opinions expressed by authors may not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.
If you died today, are you absolutely certain that you would go to heaven? You can be right now. CLICK HERE

JOIN US at FaithWriters for Free. Grow as a Writer and Spread the Gospel.


This article has been read 645 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Melanie Kerr 10/10/05
In so many churches we have a tendency to dismiss the lives of the saints - to our loss. That was an excellent picture of her life, and there are lessons for me to learn - to be himble and sacrificial. Thanks for posting.
Jan Ackerson 10/11/05
It would be very interesting to read a short story based on her life. The extensive quoting of her words and those of others here may distract some readers. But you have piqued my interest, and I'd certainly like to read more.
Alexandra Wilkin10/12/05
I would really like to have heard more of the authors feelings about St. Therese too: what is it about her that inspires you? How did you find out about her? I dont agree that lack of knowledge of Catholicism and the saints detracts from this in any way. This was very intresting and would make a great article submission if worked up a little. God bless.