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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 2 – Intermediate)
Topic: At the Pulpit (11/15/07)

TITLE: Seven Ducks in a Muddy Pond
By Emily Gibson
11/18/07


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Perhaps it was his plain talk about the Word of God. Perhaps it was his folksy stories tying that Word to our lives. Perhaps it was because he was, like the rest of us, so fully a flawed and forgiven human being. Pastor Bruce ministered to thousands over his lifetime of service, yet the simple act of climbing the steps up to the pulpit was nearly impossible for him.

Bruce had one leg. The other was lost to an above the knee amputation due to his severe diabetes. He wore an ill-fitting prosthetic leg that never allowed a normal stride and certainly proved a challenge when ascending stairs. He would come early to the sanctuary to climb the several steps to the chair behind the pulpit so he would not have to struggle in front of the congregation at the start of the service. As we would enter to find our pew seats, he would be deep in thought and prayer, already seated by the pulpit.

He often said he was a difficult person to live with because of his constant pain and health problems. His family confirmed that was indeed true, but what crankiness he exhibited through much of the week evaporated once he was at the pulpit. Standing there balanced on his good leg with his prosthesis acting as a brace, he was transformed and blessed with clarity of thought and expression. His pain was left behind.

He came to our church after many years of military chaplaincy, having served in Vietnam and a number of stateside assignments. He liked to say he “learned to meet people where they were” rather than where he thought they needed to be. His work brought him face to face with thousands of soldiers from diverse faiths and backgrounds, or in many cases, no faith at all, yet he ministered to each one in the way that was needed at that moment. He helped some as they lay dying and others who suffered so profoundly they wished they would die. He was there for them all.

One memorable sermon came from 2Kings 5: 1-19 about the healing of the great warrior Naaman who was afflicted with leprosy. Pastor Bruce clearly identified with Naaman and emphasized the message of obedience to God as the key to his healing. Like Naaman, no one would desire “Seven Ducks in a Muddy Pond” yet eventually Naaman was obedient, and despite his pride and doubts, he was cured of the incurable by bathing in the muddy Jordan.

Even upon retirement, Bruce continued to preach when churches needed a fill in pastor, and he took a part time job managing a community food and clothing bank. He was called regularly to officiate at weddings and funerals, especially for those without a church and he would oblige as his time and health allowed. His last sermon was delivered on a windy freezing December day at a graveside service for a young suicide victim. Pastor Bruce was standing at the head of the casket and having concluded his message, he bowed his head to pray, continued to bend forward, appeared to embrace the casket and breathed his last. He was gone just like that, having done his work so well and with such courage for many years.

He was not standing up high at the pulpit the day he died. He was down getting muddy in the muck and mess of life with the rest of us, reminding us of the message of grace and redemption we longed to hear and he loved to tell. Bruce’s obedience to the Lord helped heal us all.


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This article has been read 546 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Joanne Sher 11/24/07
What a lovely tribute to a wonderful pastor. This is beautifully written, and obviously heartfelt. Much to learn from this piece. This truly touched me.
Patricia Todd11/24/07
Very well written and interesting to read.
Deborah Engle 11/24/07
I enjoyed reading this piece. It was well written and a wonderful tribute.
Debbie Wistrom11/26/07
Down to earth and well written, keep at it.
Colin Swann11/26/07
Ditto....to all that's been said in the above praise of your article. You had me foxed by the title.