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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 2 – Intermediate)
Topic: Teacher (10/26/06)

TITLE: Professor Abrahamís Influence
By
10/30/06


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The first two pages from a Theological studentís journal reveal the following:


Theology classes resumed yesterday. Professor Abraham, an interesting teacher, approaches mid-sixties with an elegant air about him. Amid his gray, thinning hair, balding patches appear. His rounded, thickened glasses over-emphasis his deep blue eyes, creating a permanently shocked expression. Heís a cardigan man, definitely a fashion of my fatherís era. Professional elocution intensifies his lectures, obviously from a sophisticated background. Procrastination would never be customary in his course of instruction.

Ephesians studied in Greek would possibly be the most difficult subject any student would have to endure. Professor Abraham has the ability to embrace every use of the language with excellence. Although some students find studying Hebrew fascinating, I struggle with the dialect. Abrahams teaching expertise persevered with further tutorials through the earlier semester to keep struggling students at the peak of their performance.

Acts recipient, Theophilus, is one of the professorís favorite discussion characters. Students anticipate an in-depth debate tomorrow as we endeavor to cover chapter eight. I learn a great deal about a subject through the satisfaction of debating. One of the most appealing characteristics of Professor Abraham is the diversity of his teaching ability.

Christology study releases the ĎTeacherí within the Professor. His faith in Jesus Christ the Son of God absorbs his complete being. His fortitude rises in anticipation as he shares his knowledge of his Lord, Savior and Holy Spirit. I am absolutely absorbed by his plausible insights and motivation on the topic. His testifying assurance brought students to tears throughout the crowded lecture theatre this morning. Captivated by the teacherís dedication, I make an appointment to discuss the option of graduate work next year as an external student to further my studies in this subject.

History of the church is another favorite subject. Majoring in a subject that highlights a courageous faith in the early church stimulates my awareness of outreach in the community. Abraham leads an off-campus outreach and Bible study group on Wednesdays, taking the Gospel to the wider community. Attending one of his meetings brought a renewed excitement to the reason I first applied to attend the Bible Institute.

Eschatology classes are often noisy due to the diversity of backgrounds of students and the professor. Discovering the wide range of predetermined philosophies can be daunting even to me, a third year student of theology.

Realization that I will be graduating at the end of this semester brings excitement and anticipation. To be ordained is the next step into my future. Studying over the past three years under the guidance of a dedicated teacher as Professor Abraham coalesced with the youth ministry leadership at Centerville Christian Church, has energized my commitment to fulfill my calling into fulltime ministry. I have been offered a position in Centerville, but I believe the Lord has called me to outreach into its neighboring community where street gangs and homeless roam the town.


Footnote:
Professor Abraham has been a great influence in my training. My heart is burdened by the society in which we live. Promises in Godís word and the teaching injected into my life will herald my purpose to fulfill Godís calling on my life.


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This article has been read 918 times
Member Comments
Member Date
julie wood11/02/06
I enjoyed this story as it brought back memories of my own college days and religious studies classes. I really enjoyed the initial character description of Professor Abraham--I could see him!

I also enjoyed the clever acronym "teacher" formed by the first letter of each paragraph.

The story's pedantic wording came across as a little dry and maybe hard for some people to follow--but at the same time, it seemed right in keeping with the setting and the main character!
Amy Michelle Wiley 11/04/06
I like the acronym, too, and I think that though the words are long, it goes well with the setting, as someone else mentioned. Good job!
Dennis Fletcher11/04/06
The article was well done, the acronym was quite effective. I even liked the longer, hard to understand, wording. It actually fit and seemed to come from a journal of a person who tends to think a lot, utilizing their education to its fullest. Well done.
L.M. Lee11/04/06
excellent! very clever.
Aylin Smith 11/04/06
Great job.
Suzanne R11/05/06
Wow - very impressive words. Is Professor Abraham a real man? Maybe you will send him a copy of this? I also liked the description in the 'T' paragraph. Well done.
Joanne Sher 11/06/06
I definitely enjoyed the acronym, and though the language IS a bit "heavy", I also agree that it fits with the subject and point of the piece! Nice job!
Jan Ackerson 11/06/06
Very good job of actually showing his influence through your professor-ly writing. I feel as if I've been in his class, and learned a lot.
dub W11/06/06
Clever and interesting; for the most part well written. Thank you for posting.
Sara Harricharan 11/06/06
Loved this! Very fun, the way the words were arranged. I enjoyed reading this, good job!
Val Clark11/07/06
Great character study. I love 'cardigan man' very visual and encapsulates a great deal about the man.
Marilee Alvey11/07/06
The language level in this story interfered with my reading of it. I would be concerned that the reading level of most would not be able to tackle it. (Perhaps I need to not get so involved with speaking in prison ministry and it's third grade reading level!) I could understand this language, but tend to be on the lazy side. I suppose it also depends on what you are looking to do when you read: be entertained, be educated, be uplifted.... Purpose and target audience are very important. That having been said, I, too, love the acronym usage. You have an extensive, impressive vocabulary and obviously have a lot of abilities with the written word. You are, quite clearly, VERY intelligent, and, indeed, a wordsmith!
Donna Emery11/07/06
Interesting and informative. Thanks for sharing this!
Valora Otis11/07/06
I tend to look for the story within a story. I found as I read this piece a second time, that not only did the student grow in intellect and spirituality through the years, the professor did as well. Although written in a scholarly fashion, this piece flowed perfectly. It's my opinion that this should rank high for creativity.:-)
Pat Guy 11/08/06
You did a great job of setting the mood and pace of the story. And the character is right on! You used your words well in creating him.

A very creative, well written take on the subject!
Trina Courtenay11/08/06
I enjoyed your level of language. It makes one think which is a good thing. Keep up the 'great' work. Blessings as you write to glorify HIM!
Betty Castleberry11/08/06
I like your interpretation of our topic. This was very clever. It gives a glimpse into the mind of a student as well. Nicely done.
Catrina Bradley 11/08/06
Very creative take on the topic. Love the journal idea. In the E paragraph I was a little confused when the student began with discussing studying Greek, then said Hebrew was difficult. I absolutely loved reading this level of intelligent writing! Great job.
Laurie Glass11/08/06
A unique take on the topic. I, too, thought your format was effective. Good job.
Venice Kichura11/11/06
very creative & orginal!