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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 1 – Beginner)
Topic: The Deep End (03/06/14)

TITLE: Jesus is in the deep end
By Linda Buskirk
03/13/14


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I knew the moment after I said it that I had made my small audience uneasy. Eyes widened, backs straightened, feet shifted. I made a note of it mentally and just kept talking. I was presenting ideas about how this leadership committee of St. David's could engage their congregation in a process "to discern a vision for what God is calling this church to do."

It would be a project to awaken and enliven the congregation. Committee members had warmly welcomed me and seemed eager and excited about their work, but part of my message tonight was making them uncomfortable. The minister privately shared with me that St. David's was struggling with its identity.

The village in which the white clapboard church was centered was once the chosen enclave of rich and powerful banking and industrial gentry of the nearby urban metropolis. Through the decades, old-money families had scattered, their industries rusted or sold out to international corporations. The village was discovered and populated by above-average income families who enjoyed its refuge, but were engaged in a myriad of work and social activities in the city, easily reached by nearby interstates.

St. David's existed today more as a quaint postcard icon for the village than as a weekly destination for neighbors. Church membership was now driving further to worship here, coming out of their way to do so. Their beaten paths during the week did not naturally cross the village so mid-week activities at the church struggled with attendance.

Those who did come, even if only on Sunday, loved this historic, holy place of worship. They had found a home here, and wanted to share it with others. The leadership group was assembled to find ways "to make St. David's more welcoming and attractive."

So far, they focused on aesthetics and things – painting, new landscaping, structural changes to improve accessibility. My job as a consultant was to challenge them, so I asked, "What is your vision for the impact of these changes?"

"Obviously, St. David's will be more welcoming," answered Luke, the committee chair.

"Yes, but let's go deeper," I encouraged. "This project will focus your discernment on the purpose and plan that Jesus has in mind for you."

That's when everyone got squirmy. I explained that we would begin by exploring the particular gifts God has gathered together at St. David's. "Our creative God has amazing plans in mind for his followers individually and collectively, so let's dive in by taking inventory of the gifts of St. David's."

"I thought we would be talking about projects. I've spent a lot of time getting cost estimates for what we need to do," said Max, the focused chair of the Property Commission.

"Ah, Max, you are gifted to help the church with its physical presence. Is it enough for you that when your work is done, the church will be inviting?" I asked.

"I never thought about it." It seemed almost a confession, but guilt was not my objective.

"Not to worry, Max. Or any of you. You obviously all care deeply about this place. I suspect your true motivations run much deeper than a fresh coat of paint. But it seems you have been paddling around in the shallow end of the future."

"I suppose Jesus is in the deep end," offered Susan, the Outreach Chair, who added the obvious, "I guess we didn't expect to be talking about Jesus quite so, so plainly."

"Susan, you are correct,” I answered. “Jesus IS in the deep end, and that’s where we are headed. You can trust Him not to let you sink in any part of the pool. But it is His pool, after all. I speak of Him plainly to help me, and you, focus on Him. We are the church of Jesus Christ. If you don’t dive into that source of your identity, St. David’s could amount to the Rotary or the Country Club - a social gathering of people who do some good works and listen to good music.”

The meeting continued with a review of the process ahead. Later in my hotel room I prayed that my mini-lecture was helpful, not terrifying. I needed the leadership to trust me. We were in for a long swim together.


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This article has been read 78 times
Member Comments
Member Date
CD Swanson 03/13/14
I was into this story from the very first paragraph to the very last. Great job!

God bless~
Lillian Rhoades 03/14/14
You obviously have excellent writing skills. Your opening sentence was a great hook. I definitely wanted to read more. Your piece flowed well with great detail and excellent word usage.

Opinion: I would eliminate the first set of quote marks because you're presenting an idea, and it's not necessary to put that idea in quotes.

Although the placement of the adverb " mentally" is acceptable as is, "a mental note of it" sounds less awkward. I'm not sure if you intentionally meant to use this sentence fragment - "Or any of you," for effect, but as a general rule, it would be written as, "Not to worry, Max, or any of you."

Your story brought me right into the middle of the middle, and you concluded well. I see you moving up the level ladder very quickly.
Lillian Rhoades 03/14/14
Sorry.:-)..."middle of the meeting..."
Larry Whittington03/16/14
This is a good teaching article. Many churches today only try to "modernise" instead of se the direction God has envisioned for them.

Take all of us along with you.

There was an easy flow of thought and easy to read.
Toni Hammer 03/18/14
What an engaging story! Your opening hook was brilliant and your story was super interesting. You're not going to be in Level 1 much longer.

One thought I have is that when you compare the church to the Rotary or country club, I'd ask you to choose just one. The "or" weakened the idea to me.

Seriously, wonderful job. I enjoyed this so much.
Rachel Malcolm 03/18/14
Great story! The conflict at the beginning had me hooked. This scenario is so common today and your knowledge and application is very convincing.
Shann Hall-LochmannVanBennekom 03/20/14
Congratulations on ranking 8th in your level. The highest rankings can be found on the message boards.