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Previous Challenge Entry (Level 1 – Beginner)
Topic: The Writer's Life (05/13/10)

TITLE: Medicine For A Broken Spirit
By Pam Ford Davis
05/18/10


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A writer is moved to chronicle a message, in hopes of sharing useful information and touching the lives of readers. Christian writers are aware that all inspiration is channeled through a creative flow of the Holy Spirit. It begins as a fleeting thought that captures the attention like flashing neon signs. The thought progresses to a theme and materializes as a crafted piece on parchment.


Like snow flakes, each writer’s life is like no other. Some are whimsical and consider each project an opportunity to share whit and humor. Many are structured and allow logic and factual information to direct each writing experience. There are carefree personalities who spread sunshine on every page. Those who battle the demons of depression and despair turn to ink wells containing the blood of a broken heart.


June 19, 1834 marks the birth date of the Prince of Preachers, Charles H. Spurgeon. The understated description of prolific writer is brought to light in biographical sketches. Popular opinion implies there is more in print by him than any other author, in either secular or sacred material. Sermons were bound and preserved, becoming volumes placed on pastors’ shelves as authoritative words of a mentor. The Interpreter book held so many scriptures and hymns it compares to a large family Bible.


His Daily Devotionals, Morning-By-Morning; Evening-By-Evening are as inspirational, motivating, and convicting as when first published. To covet is a sin; I confess I envy the power and persuasion this servant of God possessed. His mastery of the English language is compelling and worthy of highest praise.


Before knowing the writer, we must meet the man. By the age of 21 his preaching held high acclaim in London. During his lifetime it is believed he preached to a number around ten million. He could capture the attention of crowds and readers. Yet, he could not cast off the stronghold of repeated attacks of depression.


He did not condone the attitude of doubt and despair. Instead he used them to display God’s strength being perfected in our weakness. “Concerning this thing I pleaded with the Lord three times that it might depart from me. And He said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness.’ Therefore most gladly I will rather boast in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me. Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in needs, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ’s sake. For when I am weak, then I am strong (2 Corinthians 12:8-10 NKJ).”


Spurgeon also suffered with serious personal bodily illness. Daily pressures of concern for his bed-ridden wife added to his despondency. For many years illness prevented the woman from attending her highly respected husband’s worship services. God’s spokesman could find just cause for self pity and murmuring. Instead his melancholy formed the powerful persuasion I seek in my devotional writing.


The life of any writer must reach a closing chapter. Charles H. Spurgeon died on January 31, 1892. His written messages live on and minister to countless multitudes. His writing spans the globe today, both in book form and via the World Wide Web. The impact of his writing transforms lives and brings glory to the Master. Sample some of his workmanship soon. It is food for the soul and medicine for a broken spirit.


The opinions expressed by authors may not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.
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This article has been read 589 times
Member Comments
Member Date
Maria Egilsson 05/20/10
What a profound statement:

"Those who battle the demons of depression and despair turn to ink wells containing the blood of a broken heart."

There was a lot of "meat" in this piece that inspires, encourages, convicts and informs.

Thank you for writing this excellent piece.
AnneRene' Capp 05/20/10
What a deep and nurturing article. I was so ministered to by this and loved learning about Spurgeon. Your phrase: ink wells containing the blood of a broken heart, is outstanding!
Fern Brown05/20/10
Excellent! I sense a love for God and His righteousness in your writing.
Mildred Sheldon05/24/10
I enjoyed this more than mere words can say. From broken spirits come some of the most profound pieces of writings that stir mind, body, heart and soul. Thank you for an article that is filled with love. Keep writing and God bless.
Dusti (Bramlage) Zarse05/24/10
Your piece perfectly embodies how difficult a writer's life can seem at times. To be a truly profound writer, one must be sensitive to all emotions, feelings, experiences, and understandings. It is difficult to write with conviction what you have not experienced yourself, and so often the most significant pieces of literature are filled with pain, suffering, depression, and healing. How is the writer able to convey this truly well? By experiencing it himself. Charles Spurgeon is an excellent example, and you did honor to his life, and to the fact that God's grace is sufficient, even for writers!
Beth B05/24/10
What a gem you have shared with us all. Others have touched on some of my favorite phrases. I also liked: "Like snow flakes, each writer's life is like no other." Another: "A writer is move to chronicle a message..." Loved the ending: "The impact of his writing transforms lives and brings glory to the Master..." And that is what we all want. Thanks for sharing about one of our beloved preachers.