Hire
Writers
Editors
Home Tour About Read What's New Help Join Faith
Writers
Forum
My Account Login
Shop
Save
Support
Book
Store
Learn
About
Jesus
  

Get Our Daily Devotional             Win A Publishing Package             Detailed Navigation

The HOME for Christian writers! The Home for Christian Writers!
THE CRITIQUE CIRCLE

BACK TO
CRITIQUE CIRCLE

INSTRUCTIONS
COMPLETE
INSTRUCTIONS HERE

CRITIQUE GUIDELINES

CRITIQUE TIPS

HELP TOUR

It's easy to critique the works of others and get your work critiqued. Just follow the steps below:

1) Post your first piece.

2) You must then critique the work of another member to post another piece yourself.

3) For each critique you give, you earn 1 credit that can be used to post another one of your writings.

4) You can build up credits to be used at another time by giving critiques to others.
Our Daily Devotional HERE
Place it on your site or
receive it daily by email.





TRUST JESUS TODAY

TRY THE TEST





TITLE: Late Entry-Unsung Hero Challenge
By Bella Louise
01/04/07
 SEND A PRIVATE COMMENT
 SEND ARTICLE TO A FRIEND

This was supposed to go into the "Unsung Hero" challenge, but I didn't get it finished in time. I've just polished it off, and I thought I'd see what people thought of it.
Some people donít have any heroes. Most people have only one. Iím the exception. Normally I hate to be an exception, but this time Iím proud. I have two heroes. One of them is a man I barely remember. The other is his wife, my Grandma. I know very little about Grandpa, and I donít know too much more about Grandma. I do know enough, though, to know that they are heroes.

Grandpa fought for our country and our freedom during the Second World War. He was born in 1918, just after a hideous conflict shattered most of our world. I wonder. Did his mother thank God that her baby boy was born late, and would never have to see such terror? I donít know. What I do know is that he did see such terror, and worse. Iíve no idea what his job was in the army, or whether he was decorated for it. I do know that my own father, Grandpaís son, mentioned once that he always disliked fireworks, because of the memories that they evoked. Memories of explosions, I gathered. I do know that my Grandpa waited for love, and put duty first. He didnít marry Grandma until he came back.

Unlike most people that I, with all the blunt-headedness of sixteen, would call old, I can see Grandma as a young, beautiful bride. When she talks to me of Grandpa now, I can see that she is still very much in love with him, though he died nearly thirteen years ago. Although simply waiting for love is heroism, although letting Grandpa go off to war and fight is heroism, my Grandma is far more heroic than that. You see, she was a nurse. I donít know when she qualified. I do know that she nursed injured soldiers during the Second World War, and saw things that, at the time, no young girl should have seen. I love to make-believe that Grandpa was injured and she nursed him back to health, though I know that is not true. I donít know when exactly she reached retirement age. I do know that, well into her seventies, my good grandmother continued to volunteer as a nurse. I wonder how many lives she has saved? She worked for the NHS all those years, when, with her training, she could have worked for substantially more pay and a better pension. I donít know what pension the government gives her. I do know that she is the same age as the Queen (almost to the day) and that she lives in a lot less comfort. I do know that, despite her relative lack, she still insists on giving my brother and I money every time we go to see her, and at Christmas and our birthdays, or sometimes, for no reason except sheer love.

But do you know? These things are not what make my Grandpa and Grandma heroes. What makes them heroes is that, when Dad and Elise and Jamie reached their teens, and fell apart, their parents did not. Whatever life threw at Grandpa and Grandma, they stayed full of hope. They kept their enthusiasm for life. Even now, I can sense Grandmaís great joy in life when I speak to her. Goodness knows sheís had enough to make her sad, but she chose to keep hope. They kept their hope alive, and in time it was rewarded. Grandpa and Grandma, to cut a very long story short, are my heroes. They are my heroes because they taught me to hope.
The opinions expressed by authors may not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.
YOUR CREDITS

LOGIN HERE




REMINDER:

REMEMBER, this is a Critique Circle. Please try to give a critique to receive a critique. If you do not want to give any critiques, you can use the REGULAR ARTICLE SUBMISSION area. If you are unsure about how to critique, please use the CRITIQUE GUIDELINES and CRITIQUE TIPS.

VIEWING CRITIQUES:

To view your critiques that you receive on any writing, login to your account and click "CRITIQUE CIRCLE MANAGEMENT" to view all of your critiques and edit each piece. Then, click "VIEW CRITIQUES" next to the article title to view critiques on that piece. Comments on all of your writings when using the Critique Circle will not be displayed publicly as regular and writing challenge articles. They can only be viewed by accessing them from your account.