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TITLE: My Life as a Cat- part one
By Alison Greenberg
05/11/09
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This is part one of a story that I'd like you to also read in order to fully understand. Thanks!
We were leaving the house to go to Chicago for the day as Dad examined the tailpipe of the car.

"Are you sure we should go, Walter?" my mother asked as she anxiously twisted her kerchief.

"I'm sure it will be fine. Okay kids! Who wants to go have some fun?!"

"We do!" the three of us yelled in response.

About halfway through the trip, Mark and I felt carsick.

"Just try to go to sleep and you'll feel better" Mom reassured us. Farther down the road, Pete, the baby of the bunch, starting throwing a fit. That's when my parents knew something was wrong; He was the canary in the coal mine on that day.

Dad pulled off the highway, and, after trying to awaken us, they laid us out on the grassy hill by the side of the road. Before long, the Indiana State police showed up and called an ambulance.

Once inside the ambulance, the EMT's determined we'd suffered Carbon Monoxide poisoning from the tailpipe pouring the silent killer into the passenger compartment. The baby awoke first. The doctor told my mother,"I think the little one is alright. He just said, 'Go away. I .can't like you." Mom brushed back a tear. When we got to the hospital, Mark was brought out to my parents in the waiting room. Mom was crying hysterically.

"Mom, Mom, it's okay,"he repeated to her. " I'm alright." That's when he knew his little sister was not.

I watched from above as the doctors worked valiantly to save this five year old whose heart stopped twice in the emergency room. I was finally brought out to my anxious parents and brothers.

Dad was so happy to see me. he brought me right to the vending machine for a big chocolate bar. He jiggled me on his knee and I vomited all over his brand-new overcoat. We continued on to Chicago that evening after the repair of the tailpipe was completed, not quite with the same bravado as we'd had before. My mother whispered prayers of quiet thanks and praise for sparing her young ones that day. Mom was worried that the incident had done me permanent psychological harm, because I never talked about it. then one day, a few months later, I said,"Mom? Remember when we went to the hospital? I felt like I was under water." Mom hugged me and said,"I know honey. I did too."
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