Hire
Writers
Editors
Home Tour About Read What's New Help Join Faith
Writers
Forum
My Account Login
Shop
Save
Support
Book
Store
Learn
About
Jesus
  

Get Our Daily Devotional             Win A Publishing Package             Detailed Navigation

The HOME for Christian writers! The Home for Christian Writers!
THE CRITIQUE CIRCLE

BACK TO
CRITIQUE CIRCLE

INSTRUCTIONS
COMPLETE
INSTRUCTIONS HERE

CRITIQUE GUIDELINES

CRITIQUE TIPS

HELP TOUR

It's easy to critique the works of others and get your work critiqued. Just follow the steps below:

1) Post your first piece.

2) You must then critique the work of another member to post another piece yourself.

3) For each critique you give, you earn 1 credit that can be used to post another one of your writings.

4) You can build up credits to be used at another time by giving critiques to others.
Our Daily Devotional HERE
Place it on your site or
receive it daily by email.





TRUST JESUS TODAY

TRY THE TEST



ARTICLES ON WRITING


TITLE: Not a Problem
By Jae Blakney
03/31/08
 SEND A PRIVATE COMMENT
 SEND ARTICLE TO A FRIEND

Automobile production lines don’t exist, and my local college doesn’t actually offer classes. At least, that’s what I’ve read.

You’ve probably read it too. It’s the ad that declares, “All cars (or pens, or gloves, or whatever) are not created equal.” In other words, every car has been created unequal to all others. That rules out the production line.

Several years ago I was interested in taking classes at my local college. When I saw their ad in the Yellow Pages, I didn’t bother. It said, “All classes are not held in all locations.”

The problem, of course, is misplacement of the word ‘not’. It’s a common mistake, and it’s easy to make. It’s also easy to learn how to get it right. Don’t worry if you didn’t get a 4.0 in college, or if you weren’t home schooled by a genius mother. Just read on, and then practice.

Let’s look at the sentence ‘All cars are not created equal’. Because of where it’s placed in the sentence, the word ‘not’ modifies (changes or adds meaning to) the word ‘created’. So the sentence is saying that ‘not created equal’ is an attribute that applies to ‘all cars’. In other words, every car is created unequal to all others. With so many cars in the world, how do you suppose they keep track? What the advertiser really wanted to say was, ‘Not all cars are created equal.’ Now the word ‘not’ modifies the word ‘all’, which modifies the word ‘cars’. Now the sentence brings our attention to the fact that not all cars are created equal to all other cars. It still leaves the possibility that some cars may be created equal to some others. I can hear Detroit’s sigh of relief from here.

What about the classes that are not held in all locations? Take a moment, if you haven’t already, to find and correct the problem yourself, based on the example in the last paragraph. Then keep reading to check if you’ve got the idea.

In the sentence, ‘All classes are not held in all locations,’ the word ‘not’ modifies the word ‘held’. So, ‘not held’ applies to ‘all classes’ in ‘all locations’. Is there such a thing as a non-located class? Even an online class is located on a server, and on the student’s PC. The ad should have read, ‘Not all classes are held in all locations.’ Then the word ‘not’ would have modified the word ‘all’. If not all classes are held in all locations, that leaves room for some classes to be held in all locations, and for all classes to be held in some locations. It starts to sound like that famous monologue about pleasing some of the people some of the time, but now at least the students have some classes to attend. They may wish to earn their grammar credits elsewhere.

Next time you write a sentence that contains the word ‘not’ (or ‘isn’t’, ‘aren’t’, etc.), you may wish to take a moment to ask yourself which word ‘not’ modifies. It’s usually the word that comes just after. You could give yourself a chuckle. You could also catch an embarrassing mistake before your editor does.
The opinions expressed by authors may not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.
YOUR CREDITS

LOGIN HERE




REMINDER:

REMEMBER, this is a Critique Circle. Please try to give a critique to receive a critique. If you do not want to give any critiques, you can use the REGULAR ARTICLE SUBMISSION area. If you are unsure about how to critique, please use the CRITIQUE GUIDELINES and CRITIQUE TIPS.

VIEWING CRITIQUES:

To view your critiques that you receive on any writing, login to your account and click "CRITIQUE CIRCLE MANAGEMENT" to view all of your critiques and edit each piece. Then, click "VIEW CRITIQUES" next to the article title to view critiques on that piece. Comments on all of your writings when using the Critique Circle will not be displayed publicly as regular and writing challenge articles. They can only be viewed by accessing them from your account.