Hire
Writers
Editors
Home Tour About Read What's New Help Join Faith
Writers
Forum
My Account Login
Shop
Save
Support
Book
Store
Learn
About
Jesus
  

Get Our Daily Devotional             Win A Publishing Package             Detailed Navigation

The HOME for Christian writers! The Home for Christian Writers!



 
Fiction PLEASE ENCOURAGE THE AUTHOR BY COMMENTING

  LEAVE COMMENT ON ARTICLE   SEND A PRIVATE MESSAGE
  HIRE THIS WRITER
REPORT ARTICLE

 TRACK THIS AUTHOR ADD TO MY FAVORITES
corner
What's New
 
corner
 
The Voyage
by Aaron Morrow
04/19/08
For Sale
Author requests article critique


  Mail
 





Great King Adonai was sovereign over all the land. From his royal palace in Avon he ruled all of the land with justice and righteousness and all of the people of the land knew peace because of his rule.

When the appointed time came, Great King Adonai sent messengers throughout the land to find him a worthy bride. The messengers searched far and wide until they found a worthy bride for the King. Her name was Ecclesia, and she was fair and pure. All the people of the land rejoiced that the King had found his bride, and a wedding day was set.

One obstacle remained to the greatly anticipated union, the fair Ecclesia lived across a tempestuous sea and through a narrow bay in the remote fishing village of Arth. King Adonai was so involved in making preparations for his upcoming wedding that he sent messengers overland to Arth with the following message:

I’ve sent a ship
with oar and sail
and rudder made for sea
Seeking a servant
Of faithful heart
To bring my bride to me
- Great King Adonai

The messengers posted the message in the village square, and when the fishermen returned from fishing in the bay they read the message and wondered amongst themselves who would be brave enough to leave the bay and cross the sea to bring the fair Ecclesia to the Great King.

In the village lived four brothers Pneuma, Pnoe, Anemos and Vane. The brothers were known throughout the land as skilled fisherman and fearless baymen. Upon reading the message Vane, the biggest and most muscular of the brothers stepped forward.

“I will deliver fair Ecclesia to the King”

Vane grabbed the ship and oars with one huge hand and carried it to the bay. He returned and guided Ecclesia to the boat, whereupon she stood on the bow. Vane pushed the boat into the water. The entire boat nearly sank from his weight as he stepped into it. He grabbed each of the oars, and with mighty stokes he embarked on his mission for the King,

After Vane’s departure, the other brothers returned to their fishing, marveling at the courage of their brother to brave the seas.

After three days time, a shout went out through the village of Arth that Vane had returned. The other brothers were perplexed at the speed of his trip, and wondered at how even his mighty oar strokes completed the voyage and return so rapidly.

The brothers ran down to the beach and and were shocked to see Vane oaring to shore with Ecclesia still standing on the bow. Vane was soaked to the skin, sloshed out of the boat and helped Ecclesia out.

“What happened Vane?” “Are you well?” “Why have you returned with fair Ecclesia?” The brother’s questions to Vane tumbled over each other.

With a heavy sigh and a defeated glance at the bay, Vane began:

“I reached the channel to the sea by nightfall with my mighty strokes. But when I reached the narrow opening I could not pass because the oars made the boat far too wide. I tried and tried to reach the sea, but only exhausted myself in the effort. I chose instead to dive into the narrow channel, and have Ecclesia stand on my back as I swam to the sea. Though I made it to the sea, its strength overtook me and threatened to pull me under and make me a part of it along with Ecclesia. I found the strength to swim back to the ship and row back to shore.”

The brothers marveled at such endurance but were saddened by the failure of Vane’s great strength. Surely, they thought, we could never succeed where Vane had failed.

And Vane returned to his life as a bay man.

Still the message from the Great King remained in the village square:

I’ve sent a ship
with oar and sail
and rudder made for sea
Seeking a servant
Of faithful heart
To bring my bride to me
- Great King Adonai

The next day, Anemos, the most courageous (and foolhardy) of the brothers, stepped forward.

“I will deliver fair Ecclesia to the King”

Anemos grabbed the ship and sail dragged it back to the bay. He returned and guided Ecclesia to the boat, whereupon she stood on the bow. Anemos pushed the boat into the water. He set the mast in the center of the ship and He unfurled the sail. The sail filled with the breeze and the ship cut through the water with great speed.

After Anemos’ departure, the other brothers returned to their fishing, marveling at the courage of their brother to brave the seas.

After ten days time, a shout went out through the village of Arth that Anemos had returned. The other brothers were perplexed at the speed of his trip, and wondered at how his handling of wind and sail alone had completed his voyage and return so rapidly.

The brothers ran down to the beach and and were shocked to see Anemos sailing to the shore with Ecclesia still standing on the bow. Anemos appeared to be bruised and cut in many places and staggered painfully out of the boat and helped Ecclesia out.

“What happened Anemos?” “Are you well?” “Why have you returned with fair Ecclesia?” The brother’s questions to Anemos tumbled over each other.

With a heavy sigh and a defeated glance at the bay, Anemos began:

“The wind in the sail carried me past the narrow channel by nightfall and into the sea. I was making great speed toward Avon for two days and it appeared that I would reach the King by that evening. But then a mighty gale game from the icy north and drove our ship off course for many days. The wind changed direction again and again but I could not right our course. After a few days of aimless sailing my ship found it’s way again to the jagged shoal which guards the bay. I struck with such force that it threw me upon the rocks and I feared that I would become part of the sea. I was able to coach the boat to the narrow channel in the bay, and I returned to the village.”

The brother marveled at such fortune, but were saddened by the failure of Anemos’ great courage. Surely, they thought, we could never succeed where Anemos had failed.

And Anemos returned to his life as a bay man.

Yet the message from the Great King remained in the village square:

I’ve sent a ship
with oar and sail
and rudder made for sea
Seeking a servant
Of faithful heart
To bring my bride to me
- Great King Adonai

The next day, Pnoe, the most learned (though timid) of the brothers, stepped forward.

“I will deliver fair Ecclesia to the King”

Pnoe asked his brothers to move the ship back to the bay as he carried the rudder. He returned and guided Ecclesia to the boat, whereupon she stood on the bow. Pnoe sat in the boat as his brothers pushed the boat into the water. He set the rudder of the ship and under power of the breeze departed to Avon. He made straight and true his course and moved slowly to Avon.

After Pnoe’s’ departure, the other brothers returned to their fishing, marveling at the courage of their brother to brave the seas.

After twenty days time, a shout went out through the village of Arth that Pnoe had returned. The other brothers were perplexed at the speed of his trip, and wondered at how his handling of the rudder alone had completed voyage and return so rapidly.

The brothers ran down to the beach and and were shocked to see Pnoe directing the boat by rudder to the shore with Ecclesia still standing on the bow. Pnoe appeared to be much skinnier and gaunt as he watched his brothers help Ecclesia out of the boat.

“What happened Pnoe?” “Are you well?” “Why have you returned with fair Ecclesia?” The brother’s questions to Pnoe tumbled over each other.

With a heavy sigh and a defeated glance at the bay, Pnoe began:

“By the morn after we departed, I was able to navigate by the stars and rudder to the narrow channel of the bay and we slowly made our way out to the great sea. After five days we were nearing Avon when a great current in the sea began to carry the ship off course. I was able to maneuver the rudder and navigate by the stars so that the bow was always pointed toward Avon, but then the wind fell and we were at the mercy of the current. We spent many days drifting in the current without food and water, though our faces were always toward Avon. Eventually, after many days without bread or wine, the current returned us to the narrow channel of our own bay. Seeking sustenance I returned to the village.”

The brothers marveled at such navigation skills, but were saddened by the failure of Pnoe’s great intellect. Surely, they thought, we could never succeed where Pnoe had failed.

And Pnoe returned to his life as a bay man.

Yet the message from the Great King remained in the village square:

I’ve sent a ship
with oar and sail
and rudder made for sea
Seeking a servant
Of faithful heart
To bring my bride to me
- Great King Adonai

The next day the fourth brother, Pneuma, who was known through out the land as the brother that was not strong; and not courageous (and foolhardy); and not terribly bright; but a humble bay man and very loyal to the King, stepped forward.

“I will deliver fair Ecclesia to the King”

And his brothers laughed at him and their mocking questions to Pneuma tumbled over each other “What, are you stronger than I?” “Are you more courageous (or foolhardy) than I?” “Are you more intelligent than I?”

And Pneuma responded, “No, my brothers, I am nothing compared to you. But I am willing to try for my King.” And at that the brothers quieted.

His brothers moved the ship back to the bay as he carried the rudder, the oars and the sail. He set the oars in the boat, and set the rudder, and set the mast in the center. He returned and guided Ecclesia to the boat, whereupon she stood on the bow. Pneuma sat in the boat as his brothers pushed the boat into the water. He unfurled the sail which filled with the breeze, set his hand on the rudder and began to sail to the narrow channel at the mouth of the bay.

After Pneuma’s departure, the other brothers returned to their fishing, sure that their brother, like themselves would fail to cross the sea and deliver the bride to the King.

Many weeks passed and the three brothers continued to fish in the bay, but their hearts grew heavier and heavier at the thought of what may have been the fate of Pneuma and his precious cargo, Ecclesia, the bride of the Great King Adonai.

The brothers were shocked however when a shout went out through the village of Arth that messengers had come overland to deliver the good news of the eminent approach of the royal wedding.

“How can that be?” they thought as they read the proclamation in the village square:

“Make our joy complete! Come and witness the celebration of marriage uniting King Adonai and Lady Ecclesia!

All the citizens of the land are welcome!”

The three brothers joined all the citizens of Arth in the overland route to celebrate the marriage of the Great King Adonai and the Lady Ecclesia. Over mountains and through forest, glade and mighty rivers they traveled. Until, at long last, they reached the shining city of Avon and entered through it’s gates.

The entire city was a’bustle with festivities, but the three brothers were heartsick for their brother Pneuma and immediately asked the palace guards of the news:

“Excuse me,” they said in unison “do you know what became of Pneuma, the bay man of Arth.”

The guard measured them mirthfully with his eyes “And you must be Vane, for your shoulders are so broad, and you must be Pnoe, for your eyes sparkle with intellect, and you must be Anemos, for your bearing speaks of your courage (and foolhardiness).”

“How do you know me?” asked Vane.
“How do you know me?” asked Anemos.
“How do you know me?” asked Pnoe.

“Everyone knows you,” the palace guard laughed “the King himself is expecting you, run now to the great banquet hall. Pneuma has awaited you there since his arrival!”

Perplexed, the brothers ran to the banquet hall. Upon their approach four palace guards in gilded armor opened the massive doors and beckoned them to enter. The light coming from the banquet room was greater even than the light of the sun, and it took a moment for their eyes to adjust.

And then they saw the great banquet table, filled with every imaginable delicacy and fruit that could be imagined, and piled so high that the guests of the banquet appeared as dwarves to the heaped food. All but one, the Great King Adonai himself sat at the head of the table and his beauty surpassed description.

The brothers fell to their knees at the sight of the Great King, and all of the guests at the banquet fell quiet.

The voice of King Adonai rang out, “Come in my children, come in brothers of Pneuma! Come in and join our feast of celebration for my bride has arrived!”

And the banquet exploded again with the sound of laughter and joy. The brothers regained their feet and were surprised and delighted to see their brother, Pneuma, running toward them past the enormous banquet.

“What happened Pneuma?” “Are you well?” “Why did you not return?” The brothers questions to Pneuma tumbled over each other.

With a joyful laugh and an admiring glance at the King, Pneuma began:

“With the rudder to guide me, the breeze filling my sail and the oars put aside we passed the narrow channel from the bay before nightfall. We sailed on the sea through that first night, and in the morning were buffeted by a gale from the icy north. For fear of being thrown off course like Anemos, I lowered the sail, tied straight the rudder, and began to row.”

“Without the strength of Vane, I had no hope of advancing, so I dedicated myself to simply staying on course. I rowed and rowed throughout the day, not advancing a single inch but remaining true to the path. By nightfall, the gale had abated and I opened my sail and let the breeze guide me toward Avon using my rudder to keep my path straight.”

“On the third day, within sight of Avon, the breeze fell to a mere whisper and the strong current began tugging the ship off course. I opened my sails as broadly as I could, but the breeze was not strong enough to overcome the current. I put my oars in the water and began rowing but the current was too strong still”

“What did you do?” Pnoe asked, in fear that Pneuma may have drifted as he did.

“I trusted that the King would see me from the shore and provide for me. And so he did. He provided me with an idea. I tied off the rudder to point directly to Avon and I pulled the oars from the water. I lifted them high so that the wide paddles could catch the small breeze. That small breeze that I caught with the oars overcame the current and I sailed into Avon on that third day.”

Astounded by his story, the brothers, Vane, Pnoe, and Anemos, looked at each other with a newfound respect for their brother Pneuma and a deep embarrassment for having doubted him.

Pneuma, upon seeing the shame creep onto their faces said, “Do not fear my brothers, the King knew whom to expect and he knows of your bravery. You all were more courageous than I, the last to try.”

The brothers relaxed and they began to smile.

“And when I reached the shore,” Pneuma continued “the King himself pulled my ship in, and I will never forget what he said to me: ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful. You have delivered my bride. Come and share my happiness!’”

The moral: You are equipped by God with all of the tools you need to fulfill His purpose for you, use them all to His glory.




Analogy key:

King Adonai: God

Lady Ecclesia: The Body of Christ, the Church

Vane: Self-reliance (Abbreviation of Vanity)

Anemos: Impetuousness, Foolhardiness (Greek for a strong, destructive wind)

Pnoe: Intellectualism, Legalism (Greek for a weak wind or breath)

Pneuma: Humility and Faithfulness (Greek for the Spirit, or guiding wind)

The Ship: Holiness (separateness from the world)

The Oars: Works

The Rudder: The Bible

The Sail: Openness to the guiding of the Spirit

The Sea: The World

The Current: The Temptations of the World

The Gale: False Teachings and New Age Spiritualism


If you died today, are you absolutely certain that you would go to heaven? You can be! TRUST JESUS NOW

Read more articles by Aaron Morrow or search for articles on the same topic or others.


Read More - Free Reprints, Main Site Articles, Most Read Articles or highly acclaimed Challenge Articles. Read Great New Release Christian Books for FREE in our Free Reads for Reviews Program. Christian writers can JOIN US at FaithWriters for Free. Grow as a Writer and help spread the Gospel.


The opinions expressed by authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.

Hire a Christian Writer, Christian Writer Wanted, Christian Writer Needed, Christian Content Needed
Find a Christian Editor, Hire a Christian Editor, Christian Editor, Find a Christian Writer
 
corner
Corner
This article has been read 449 times     < Previous | Next >


Member Comments
Member Date
Holly Westefeld 12 May 2008
Aaron, I really enjoyed this allegory. Now for my over-thinking-things problem. What does the land represent? The boat was brought overland, and the villagers traveled to the wedding feast overland, but the bride could not be brought overland. I'm sure it should be obvious, but I'm missing it.
Aylin Smith  20 Apr 2008
Outstanding!




TRUST JESUS TODAY









Free Audio Bible
500 Plus Languages
Faith Comes By Hearing.com