To view this notification widget you need to have JavaScript enabled. This notification widget was easily created with NotifySnack.
Home Tour About Read What's New Help Forums Join Login
My Account
Shop
Save
Support
E
Book
Store
Learn
About
Jesus
  




The HOME for Christian writers!
The Home for Christian Writers!

Forums
Shop & Save to SUPPORT FaithWriters.
Upgrade to SUPPORT FaithWriters.

Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Back to the basics with regular Challenge winner, Ann Grover. Weekly lessons to help you hone your basic writing skills.

Moderator: itsjoanne

User avatar
Anja
Pencil Plus (Over 500 Posts)
Pencil Plus (Over 500 Posts)
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:20 am
Location: Canada

Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby Anja » Fri May 07, 2010 10:06 pm

Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

I been wanting to do a lesson on Verbs since I joined FW, but after I met my cowboy and after writing “The Wrote-Off Writer,” I wanted to do this lesson even more... so here it is.

I do understand that using the wrong verb tense is sometimes part of your particular “dialect,” and that is fine. For my cowboy, it's the vernacular; it's his language, and to me, it's rather endearing. It’s also okay to use for story dialogue. But for formal essays, and in general, for your fiction writing, it is NOT fine.

Verbs have three Principal Parts: Present, Past, and Past Participle.


I ask (Present)
I asked (Past)
I had asked (Past Participle)

I jump
I jumped
I had jumped

I love
I loved
I had loved


Get the idea?

Now, it’s all fine for regular verbs, which are the ones that you make into the past or past participle by adding “ed.” The trouble begins when you use irregular verbs... and knowing when to use the auxiliary verb “HAD.”


This is where my cowboy (real name = Dan) and the story “The Wrote-Off Writer” comes in. (And also a few of my other trapper / cowboy / farmer-type characters in a few of my stories.)

Because those people (and some of you) LEAVE OUT the auxiliary verb when using the PAST PARTICIPLE form of the verb

OR

ADD the auxiliary verb when using the SIMPLE PAST TENSE.

I had saw a bear. (Incorrect)
I seen a bear. (Incorrect)

(My eyes are bleeding just typing that out for you.)

The most common mistakes I hear - in public - from people who SEEM to be otherwise well-educated are:

She HAD WENT to town.
He HAD BROKE the cup.
The dog HAD TORE up the flower bed.
The cowboy HAD already RODE all over looking for the lost steer.


All the above are examples of ADDING an auxiliary with the PAST TENSE.

Here are some more:

The horse RUN around the field.
They BEGUN the concert at 7 p.m.
The choir SUNG four songs on Easter Sunday.


These examples show using the PAST PARTICIPLE WITHOUT an Auxiliary VERB

How do you know what to use?
YOU HAVE TO LEARN IRREGULAR VERBS. Yes, memorize them.

BOOKMARK this list as a reference.


Irregular Verbs

Anything in the third column (Past Participle) MUST USE an auxiliary verb.

I don’t even want to mention totally wrong forms of verbs, but I will because it is just as common.


frozed
shooked
drug (As in: The farmer DRUG the plough through the dirt.)
writed
swang
throwed
stang
choosed
drawed


Those words are FINE - IF you are writing AUTHENTIC dialogue, but even real cowboys or farmers wouldn’t use some of those words). And they are great if your four-year-old is learning to talk.

So... write me some sentences... incorrect AND correct... just let me know which are which.
Ann Grover

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

User avatar
helen1975
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
 
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:46 pm
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby helen1975 » Tue Jun 19, 2012 8:37 pm

Hi Ann,

I'm not sure if you are still following this link (it's pretty old!) but I thought I'd throw some sentences down.

Most of this is straight forward in my mind, but there are a few tricky ones I wanted to check.

I see a bear.
I saw a bear.
I had seen a bear.


I will become angry if you keep that up. (present)
I became angry when you kept that up. (past)
I had become angry when you had kept that up. (past participle).


I will buy that jumper. - present
I bought that jumper. - past and past participle

The following one is bugging me!

Today I brought the pasta salad.
I brought the pasta salad.
I had brung the pasta salad. or I had brought the pasta salad.

**Dictionary.com tells us that 'brung' is "a past participle and simple past tense of bring." It just doesn't sound right, but then neither does the second option! :heehee

Any thoughts, corrections are always welcome!

:thankssign Helen

User avatar
Anja
Pencil Plus (Over 500 Posts)
Pencil Plus (Over 500 Posts)
 
Posts: 807
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:20 am
Location: Canada

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby Anja » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:16 pm

It's a good thing I haven't had lunch yet, because I would have spewed on my laptop.

NO.

Do not use brung. Or brang. Or broughten.

It is slang. It is bad grammar. As always, it's perfectly fine for dialogue if your character is an uneducated redneck.

A short while ago, Jan mentioned the flagrant and incorrect use of drug as the past tense for drag. NO.

Same goes for tooken.

Dictionary.com may have had a note that "brung" is a common slang term. I hope it did not endorse it as accepted and correct grammar. :shocked
Ann Grover

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

User avatar
helen1975
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
 
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:46 pm
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby helen1975 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 6:25 pm

I apogise for your near loss of lunch!

I returned to Dictionary.com and found the error was mine :oops: They have the listing as "Verb: dialect." This was yet another learning point for me, to read the information properly! :roll:

Blessings,

Helen

Caleb Cheong
Pencil 1 (1-49 Posts)
Pencil 1 (1-49 Posts)
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Oct 24, 2013 1:12 am

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby Caleb Cheong » Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:19 am

Hi Ann!

Is the Present Participle another part of a verb? Does it serve any useful purposes in fiction and non-fiction writing?



Thank you.

Looking forward to hearing from you.


Regards

Caleb

User avatar
Shann
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 5460
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 7:35 pm
Location: Western NY super rural

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby Shann » Fri Dec 20, 2013 4:36 pm

Hey Caleb, I was just perusing and saw your answer. Ann's not been around for a while and perhaps you've taken your question to Jan already, but I wanted to answer just in case...
I found several helpful sites: http://www.edufind.com/english/grammar/ ... iciple.php
The present participle is the base verb and an ing
EX:
I an walking.
She is singing.

After verbs of movement.
EX:
to go shopping
My favorite site is http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm

In one respect, the present participle is a simple, straightforward construction and is formed by adding -ing to the base form of a verb. No exceptions.

But after that, it gets a bit more complicated. This site gives the following advice: http://grammar.about.com/od/irregularve ... le-FAQ.htm


For one thing, the label is misleading. It's true that the present participle (in this example, rising) sometimes appears to indicate present time: She looks at the rising sun.

But when the tense of the main verb changes to the simple past, the time of the "present" participle seems to change right along with it:
She looked at the rising sun.
And when the main verb points to the future, the "present" participle again tags along:
She will look at the rising sun.

The truth is, the present participle really doesn't mark time at all. That job is reserved for the main verb and its auxiliaries. And for this reason, many linguists prefer to use the term -ing form rather than present participle.


When a verb plus -ing does the job of a noun, it becomes a gerund.

Then again, when an -ing word is combined with the auxiliary verb to be, it functions as a verb:

The price of oil is rising.
This construction is called the present progressive.

I hope it helps a little. If you do have more questions, and haven't asked Jan yet, I'd urge you to do so.
Last edited by Shann on Fri Dec 20, 2013 10:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Shann

Shann's Profile

Sometimes God calms the storm; Sometimes He lets the storm rage and calms His child

User avatar
RachelM
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
Pencil 6 (300-499 Posts)
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 11:52 pm

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby RachelM » Fri Dec 20, 2013 8:17 pm

Thanks, Shann! Much of this seems over my head. I think I need to take a grammar course. Does anyone know of a good online course?
My FaithWriters profile: RachelM FW member profile

User avatar
Shann
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 5460
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 7:35 pm
Location: Western NY super rural

Re: Principle Parts of a Verb - And How to Use Them Properly

Postby Shann » Fri Dec 20, 2013 8:40 pm

Not a course per se but when checking things I love grammar girl and I have a site that gives a quiz after each lesson. It's one of my favorites, but all you really need is a good editor. :mrgreen:
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/commas.htm
Shann

Shann's Profile

Sometimes God calms the storm; Sometimes He lets the storm rage and calms His child


Return to Ann's Grammar Basics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


© MeasurelessMedia. All rights reservedTerms of Service



Jesus - True for You But not for Me      Website Builder     Build Website     Is Jesus God?    
Does God exist?     Build a writers website     Does truth exist?     Website online in minutes