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Nominative / Objective Case

Back to the basics with regular Challenge winner, Ann Grover. Weekly lessons to help you hone your basic writing skills.

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Anja
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Nominative / Objective Case

Postby Anja » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:33 am

This came up in another lesson, so I'm repeating it here. Yes, we all need it, even though it seems elementary and simple.


Nominative Case: The category of nouns used as the "grammatical subject" of a sentence. Think of the word "nom," which means "name." So nominative means the "name of something"... whether its a pronoun, actual name, or noun. Subjective just means related to being Nominative.

Don't get hung up on terms... but focus on the correct usage.

The pronouns in these sentences are used nominatively.

I went to town.
She went to town.
He went to town.
They went to town.

And so on....

Objective case: nouns that are the "objects" of verbs. Objects "receive" the action.

These pronouns are used objectively.

Carol gave it to me.
Carol gave it to her.
Carol gave it to them.
Carol gave it to us.



And that prompts the question about the "you" and "me" rule. Or when to use the nominative or objective case of other pronouns.


Mary and I went to town.

Carol went with Mary and me to town.


Carol went with her and Mary to town.


The test to know which case to use? Remove the "other person" from the sentence. Which sounds proper?


I went to town... OR... ME went to town.

Carol went with I to town... OR... Carol went with ME to town.

Carol went with HER to town... OR... Carol went with SHE to town.


Get the idea? Any questions?
Ann Grover

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

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Postby AnneRene' » Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:30 pm

Hi Ann,
I ALWAYS get confused with using I or me. Sometimes, rarely...it sounds ok using both.

BUT, that being said, I think I've got it. I came up with a mental reminder for using I or me. MOP=move other person.....out of sentence and see which one sounds correct.

I do like your easy reminders for remembering.

P.S...don't cringe at my comma usage...I am making it a point to, sit down, undisturbed and read your teachings from the beginning, as I pasted them to word.

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nominative/objective case

Postby Praiser » Mon Jul 19, 2010 6:23 pm

Ann, thank you so much for all your lessons. They are a big help to me.
God Cares, from the least to the greatest, God Cares.

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Postby Shann » Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:37 am

Thank you for pointing out one of my biggest pet peeves. I hope you don't mind if I add this additional point. Hopefully I won't confuse people more, but since you made me so happy by pointing out my pet peeve...

but if you are using the verb to be (is, are, am) then often the nominitive case is switched around. For example: It is I. This is she. Sensible people are they.

The way to know the correct usage in this case is to say the sentence backward. I am it. This is she. They are sensible people.

I know sometimes that feels awkward, but it is technically the correct usage.

Thank you for everything you do to help us become better writers. I appreciated all I have learned from both you and Jan. You two rock!
Shann

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Sometimes God calms the storm; Sometimes He lets the storm rage and calms His child


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