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one more look at POV

These lessons, by one of our most consistent FaithWriters' Challenge Champions, should not be missed. So we're making a permanent home for them here.

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glorybee
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one more look at POV

Postby glorybee » Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:46 pm

Holly, you said so many wonderful things in your post that I should consider you a guest teacher for this lesson. Other students, listen up--if you're just reading the "Jan" posts and skipping the others, go back and read Holly's (hwnj). She's the master of unique POVs, and she thought of tons of things that I wouldn't have thought of. If you need a digest of the best stuff, here are a few great bits of Holly's POV wisdom:

I think if I were to try and write from a biblical character's POV, I would attempt to delay recognition until near or at the end of the story.


Have a reason for writing from a human POV. If you’re teaching a lesson, and the lesson could be taught just as well with animal characters, reconsider.
Seriously, though, I think even adults can be charmed by animals and absorb truth to which they might have been more resistent had the characters been human--a little too close for comfort.


Objects survive much longer than humans, so could serve as somewhat of an omniscient narrator over a wide span of years. Also, objects could "observe" people when they believe that they are unobserved, giving insight to motivations and other feelings of which the reader would not otherwise be aware.
Jan Ackerson

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Postby glorybee » Mon Dec 15, 2008 6:27 pm

Carol, I'm tickled that you dropped in!

Your stories sound very intriguing! I'd love to read the not-yet-written one with the woman from Biblical times--and the one you wrote about the woman who's to blame for EVERYTHING sounds great! You're a very original thinker, and a pleasure to have in class.
Last edited by glorybee on Mon Dec 15, 2008 8:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby glorybee » Tue Dec 16, 2008 10:23 am

seenthelight wrote:My feeling about different POVs is that they can easily make or break a story. If you are going to be retelling a story that everyone knows it is probably best to find a different perspective on the story.


Perfect! So many of us here at FW have heard the Bible stories since our childhoods. They're wonderful, wonderful stories, but when told with a fresh voice, it's as if we're hearing them for the first time.

The same is true of archetypal stories--boy meets girl, wayward child, rags-to-riches--if you're going to tell a story like that, be sure to give it a kick in the pants. Either a fresh POV or a twist ending will do...
Jan Ackerson

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Postby GShuler » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:32 am

How's this for an inanimate object POV story idea:

It's a baseball game that is the most important of the year. Each member of the team is being analysed by the MC (first person POV). The MC knows things based on being near the pen where all the players talk about their lives. The MC knows the hopes, dreams, obstacles and strengths of each player and yet not one of them has ever said a word to the MC. Who is the MC? An old wooden baseball bat that hasn't been used for years but is still kept in the rack with all the other bats.

An idea like that could be done as a cute children's story (in fact, I think I remember a cartoon movie along those lines) OR it could be a powerful adult story that could deal with drug use, marital problems, health issues or any other adult issues that might be overheard in a conversation.

I'm not thinking of writing a story like that. I just mentioned it to show why I like the unique POV approach.
I had something really memorable to write here but I forgot what it was.
Gerald Shuler


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