Lillian's Question about Commas

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Anja
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Lillian's Question about Commas

Post by Anja » Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:02 pm

Lillian,

First of all, it depends on the salutation. When addressing someone (or something) directly, their name is said to be in the VOCATIVE CASE. The name is ALWAYS set off in commas, even in the middle of a sentence. Here's your example sentences.

Hi, Anne. I hope all is well. CORRECT

Hi Anne. I hope all is well. INCORRECT

Hi Anne, I hope all is well. INCORRECT


Check this salutation, in letter form.

Dear Anne,
I hope all is well.


No comma before "Anne" because "Dear" is an adjective, not a greeting term. You wouldn't write "black, horse." Same thing.

As for setting off the name in other sentences.

I hope, Anne, all is well.
I hope all is well, Anne.
I hope all is well, dear Anne.
I hope all is well, Anne, and we'll see you next week.
I hope all is well, sweet girl.


Thank you for mentioning this, Lillian. :)
Ann Grover Stocking

"What remains of a story after it is finished? Another story..." Eli Wiesel

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Re: Lillian's Question about Commas

Post by oursilverstrands » Sat Nov 08, 2014 9:00 pm

Thank YOU, Anne, for clearing that up for me. E-mails often cause us to short-circuit correct grammar; text messages make it almost obsolete. :D

Lillian.
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